MICHAEL YIP

I AM A

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Hello,

I'm Michael Yip

I am a video producer and photographer by profession. As a photographer, one of my core skills is in dance event photography, as one of only a handful of photographers experienced in covering dance events, performances and portraits. I got a chance to countries around the Asian region capturing visuals to help participants of the events immortalize their moments. If you are interested in bringing me over to your festivals/events. Just head over to the contact section and drop me a message.

Through GEMNUINE - the idea co., my team and I also provides Brand Management and PR services. Our core expertise is in helping brands evolve and attract the current market. We also provides Digital Marketing and Management services, from web designs to social media management. Drop me an email today at mike@gemnuine.com and let us know how you want us to help you.

If you are stumped by the photo, yes, I dance as well, mainly Salsa, Bachata, Kizomba, West Coast Swing and Argentine Tango. I have since stopped performing due to injuries but if you are looking for performers for corporate events/functions/parties/festivals. Do drop me a message as well as I manages some of the dance teams that is currently making the rounds performing for various clients.


Education
Kolej Bandar Utama/Central St. Martin

Diploma in Arts and Design

Kolej Damansara Utama

Diploma in Telecommunication Engineering

SMK Damansara Utama

SPM


Experience
Photographer/Video Producer

MIKE YIP STUDIO

Branding and PR

GEMNUINE - the idea co.

Digital Marketing Solutions

Abood Media Sdn Bhd


My Skills
Photography and Video Production
Brand Management and Solutions
Public Relations
Digital Marketing Solutions

14

Confirmed Bookings for 2018

4

Confirmed Destinations for 2018

6

Confirmed Dance Festivals for 2018

4

Talks Confirmed for 2018

WHAT CAN MY TEAM DO

Photography and Video Production

As our core business, this is what we are good at, capturing visuals that brings out the best for your brand.

Branding and PR

Through GEMNUINE, we specializes in helping brands redevelop, redefine and create a comprehensive marketing strategies reach the target market.

Social Media Marketing

Abood Media Sdn Bhd's core strenght in Digital Marketing Services focuses on Social Media Management and promotions.

Web Design

We also design and revamp websites as part of Abood Media Sdn Bhd's services.

Live Event Streaming Production

As part of a new offering from MIKE YIP STUDIO and partners, we also provides Live Streaming services for Events through dedicated sites or onto social media platforms.

Efficient

We pride ourselves at being good and efficient in what we do and we always try our best to deliver services that exceeds our client's expectations.

I also blogs

Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad addresses UN General Assembly



Madam President,

I would like to join others in congratulating you on your election as the President of the Seventy-Third (73rd) Session of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA).

I am confident with your wisdom and vast experience; this session will achieve the objectives of the theme for this session. I assure you of Malaysia's fullest support and cooperation towards achieving these noble goals.

Allow me to also pay tribute to your predecessor, His Excellency Miroslav Lajcak, for his dedication and stewardship in successfully completing the work of the 72nd Session of the General Assembly.

I commend the Secretary-General and the United Nations staff for their tireless efforts in steering and managing UN activities globally.

In particular, I pay tribute to the late Kofi Annan, the seventh Secretary-General of the UN from 1997 – 2006, who sadly passed away in August this year. Malaysia had a positively strong and active engagement with the UN during his tenure.

Madam President,

The theme of this 73rd Session of General Assembly, "Making the United Nations Relevant to All People: Global Leadership and Shared Responsibilities for Peaceful, Equitable and Sustainable Societies" remains true to the aspiration of our founding fathers. The theme is most relevant and timely. It is especially pertinent in the context of the new Malaysia. The new Government of Malaysia, recently empowered with a strong mandate from its people, is committed to ensure that every Malaysian has an equitable share in the prosperity and wealth of the nation.

A new Malaysia emerged after the 14th General Election in May this year. Malaysians decided to change their government, which had been in power for 61 years, i.e., since independence. We did this because the immediate past Government indulged in the politics of hatred, of racial and religious bigotry, as well as widespread corruption. The process of change was achieved democratically, without violence or loss of lives.

Malaysians want a new Malaysia that upholds the principles of fairness, good governance, integrity and the rule of law. They want a Malaysia that is a friend to all and enemy of none. A Malaysia that remains neutral and non-aligned. A Malaysia that detests and abhors wars and violence. They also want a Malaysia that will speak its mind on what is right and wrong, without fear or favour. A new Malaysia that believes in co-operation based on mutual respect, for mutual gain. The new Malaysia that offers a partnership based on our philosophy of 'prosper-thy-neighbour'. We believe in the goodness of cooperation, that a prosperous and stable neighbour would contribute to our own prosperity and stability.

The new Malaysia will firmly espouse the principles promoted by the UN in our international engagements. These include the principles of truth, human rights, the rule of law, justice, fairness, responsibility and accountability, as well as sustainability. It is within this context that the new government of Malaysia has pledged to ratify all remaining core UN instruments related to the protection of human rights. It will not be easy for us because Malaysia is multi-ethnic, multireligious, multicultural and multilingual. We will accord space and time for all to deliberate and to decide freely based on democracy.



Madam President,

When I last spoke here in 2003, I lamented how the world had lost its way. I bemoaned the fact that small countries continued to be at the mercy of the powerful. I argued the need for the developing world to push for reform, to enhance capacity building and diversify the economy. We need to maintain control of our destiny.

But today, 15 years later the world has not changed much. If at all the world is far worse than 15 years ago. Today the world is in a state of turmoil economically, socially and politically.

There is a trade war going on between the two most powerful economies. And the rest of the world feel the pain.

Socially new values undermine the stability of nations and their people. Freedom has led to the negation of the concept of marriage and families, of moral codes, of respect etc.

But the worse turmoil is in the political arena. We are seeing acts of terror everywhere. People are tying bombs to their bodies and blowing themselves up in crowded places. Trucks are driven into holiday crowds. Wars are fought and people beheaded with short knives. Acts of brutality are broadcast to the world live. Masses of people risk their lives to migrate only to be denied asylum, sleeping in the open and freezing to death. Thousands starve and tens of thousands die in epidemics of cholera.

No one, no country is safe. Security checks inconvenience travellers. No liquids on planes. The slightest suspicion leads to detention and unpleasant questioning.

To fight the "terrorists" all kinds of security measures, all kinds of gadgets and equipment are deployed. Big brother is watching. But the acts of terror continues.

Malaysia fought the bandits and terrorists at independence and defeated them. We did use the military. But alongside and more importantly we campaigned to win the hearts of minds of these people.

This present war against the terrorist will not end until the root causes are found and removed and hearts and minds are won.

What are the root causes? In 1948, Palestinian land was seized to form the state of Israel. The Palestinians were massacred and forced to leave their land. Their houses and farms were seized.

They tried to fight a conventional war with help from sympathetic neighbours. The friends of Israel ensured this attempt failed. More Palestinian land was seized. And Israeli settlements were built on more and more Palestinian land and the Palestinians are denied access to these settlements built on their land.

The Palestinians initially tried to fight with catapults and stones. They were shot with live bullets and arrested. Thousands are incarcerated.

Frustrated and angry, unable to fight a conventional war, the Palestinians resort to what we call terrorism.

The world does not care even when Israel breaks international laws, seizing ships carrying medicine, food and building materials in international waters. The Palestinians fired ineffective rockets which hurt no one. Massive retaliations were mounted by Israel, rocketing and bombing hospitals, schools and other buildings, killing innocent civilians including school children and hospital patients. And more.

The world rewards Israel, deliberately provoking Palestine by recognising Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

It is the anger and frustration of the Palestinians and their sympathisers that cause them to resort to what we call terrorism. But it is important to acknowledge that any act which terrify people also constitute terrorism. And states dropping bombs or launching rockets which maim and kill innocent people also terrify people. These are also acts of terrorism.

Malaysia hates terrorism. We will fight them. But we believe that the only way to fight terrorism is to remove the cause. Let the Palestinians return to reclaim their land. Let there be a state of Palestine. Let there be justice and the rule of law. Warring against them will not stop terrorism. Nor will out-terrorising them succeed.

We need to remind ourselves that the United Nations Organisation, like the League of Nations before, was conceived for the noble purpose of ending wars between nations.

Wars are about killing people. Modern wars are about mass killings and total destruction countrywide. Civilised nations claim they abhor killing for any reason. When a man kills, he commits the crime of murder. And the punishment for murder may be death.

But wars, we all know encourage and legitimise killing. Indeed the killings are regarded as noble, and the killers are hailed as heroes. They get medals stuck to their chest and statues erected in their honour, have their names mentioned in history books.

There is something wrong with our way of thinking, with our value system. Kill one man, it is murder, kill a million and you become a hero. And so we still believe that conflict between nations can be resolved with war.

And because we still do, we must prepare for war. The old adage says "to have peace, prepare for war". And we are forever preparing for war, inventing more and more destructive weapons. We now have nuclear bombs, capable of destroying whole cities. But now we know that the radiation emanating from the explosion will affect even the country using the bomb. A nuclear war would destroy the world.

This fear has caused the countries of Europe and North America to maintain peace for over 70 years. But that is not for other countries. Wars in these other countries can help live test the new weapons being invented.

And so they sell them to warring countries. We see their arms in wars fought between smaller countries. These are not world wars but they are no less destructive. Hundreds of thousands of people have been killed, whole countries devastated and nations bankrupted because of these fantastic new weapons.

But these wars give handsome dividends to the arms manufacturers and traders. The arms business is now the biggest business in the world. They profit shamelessly from the deaths and destructions they cause. Indeed, so-called peace-loving countries often promote this shameful business.

Today's weapons cost millions. Fighter jets cost about 100 million dollars. And maintaining them cost tens of millions. But the poor countries are persuaded to buy them even if they cannot afford. They are told their neighbours or their enemies have them. It is imperative that they too have them.

So, while their people starve and suffer from all kinds of deprivations, a huge percentage of their budget is allocated to the purchase of arms. That their buyers may never have to use them bothers the purveyors not at all.

Madam President,

In Myanmar, Muslims in Rakhine state are being murdered, their homes torched and a million refugees had been forced to flee, to drown in the high seas, to live in makeshift huts, without water or food, without the most primitive sanitation. Yet the authorities of Myanmar including a Nobel Peace Laureate deny that this is happening. I believe in non-interference in the internal affairs of nations. But does the world watch massacres being carried out and do nothing? Nations are independent. But does this mean they have a right to massacre their own people, because they are independent?

Madam President,

TRADE

On the other hand, in terms of trade, nations are no longer independent. Free trade means no protection by small countries of their infant industries. They must abandon tariff restrictions and open their countries to invasion by products of the rich and the powerful. Yet the simple products of the poor are subjected to clever barriers so that they cannot penetrate the market of the rich. Malaysian palm oil is labelled as dangerous to health and the estates are destroying the habitat of animals. Food products of the rich declare that they are palm oil free. Now palm diesel are condemned because they are decimating virgin jungles. These caring people forget that their boycott is depriving hundreds of thousands of people from jobs and a decent life.

We in Malaysia care for the environment. Some 48% of our country remains virgin jungle. Can our detractors claim the same for their own countries?

Madam President,

Malaysia is committed to sustainable development. We have taken steps, for example in improving production methods to ensure that our palm oil production is sustainable. By December 2019, the Malaysian Sustainable Palm Oil (MSPO) standard will become mandatory. This will ensure that every drop of palm oil produced in Malaysia will be certified sustainable by 2020.

Madam President,

All around the world, we observe a dangerous trend to inward-looking nationalism, of governments pandering to populism, retreating from international collaborations and shutting their borders to free movements of people, goods and services even as they talk of a borderless world, of free trade. While globalisation has indeed brought us some benefits, the impacts have proven to be threatening to the independence of small nations. We cannot even talk or move around without having our voices and movement recorded and often used against us. Data on everyone is captured and traded by powerful nations and their corporations.

Malaysia lauds the UN in its endeavours to end poverty, protect our planet and try to ensure everyone enjoys peace and prosperity. But I would like to refer to the need for reform in the organisation. Five countries on the basis of their victories 70 over years ago cannot claim to have a right to hold the world to ransom forever. They cannot take the moral high ground, preaching democracy and regime change in the countries of the world when they deny democracy in this organisation.

I had suggested that the veto should not be by just one permanent member but by at least two powers backed by three non-permanent members of the Security Council. The General Assembly should then back the decision with a simple majority. I will not say more.

I must admit that the world without the UN would be disastrous. We need the UN, we need to sustain it with sufficient funds. No one should threaten it with financial deprivation.

Madam President

After 15 years and at 93, I return to this podium with the heavy task of bringing the voice and hope of the new Malaysia to the world stage. The people of Malaysia, proud of their recent democratic achievement, have high hopes that around the world – we will see peace, progress and prosperity. In this we look toward the UN to hear our pleas.

I thank you, Madam President.

New immigration rule for Malaysians travelling to EU countries from 2020


 From year 2020, Malaysians who wish to travel to European Union countries may be required to undergo a new immigration process.

This new immigration process called the European Travel Information and Authorisation System (ETIAS) may become a mandatory requirement for citizens from visa-free countries. More details at the ETIAS website (click here).

According to etiaseurope.eu website, citizens from visa-free countries can stay in the Schengen Area (all EU states except Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland, Romania and The United Kingdom) for a period up to 90 days.

“It is an immigration process used to address the potential threats of ineligible individuals before they can cross the borders of the EU states.

“ETIAS with the Entry–Exit System (EES) will speed up, facilitate, reinforce and modernise the border control procedures by offering better protection against document and identity fraud,” said the website.

Each citizen from the visa-free countries need to hold a valid ETIAS prior to boarding.

“Once issued, a valid authorisation will allow its holder to stay in the Schengen Area for a period of up to 90 days in any 180-day period and it is valid for 3 years from the date of issuance or until the expiry date of the passport, whichever comes first,” it said.

The application process is simple as it can be done online and it was recommended that applicants apply for an ETIAS at least 72 hours prior to departure.

“It only takes up to 10 minutes and only costs RM48.30 (10 Euros). Each individual travelling in a group needs to be authorised.

“However, applicants under the age of 18 do not have to pay the processing fee,” it said.

Among the documentation requirements for this process includes a valid passport issued by a visa-exempt country, a valid credit card to pay the application fee, applicants contact information including the address of permanent residence, phone number and email address.

It also stated that once the application has been submitted online, it would be screened across various systems to determine whether an authorisation could be granted or not.

“If your application is approved, you will receive an authorisation directly by email and in case of denial, you will receive an email explaining the reason for refusal.”

Among the countries which requires ETIAS online authorisation include Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Vatican City State.

My 1st Tattoo


After 40 years on this planet, I finally got my 1st tattoo done when I was in Bali for a dance festival. Of course, this only made possible thanks to the constant pestering by le wifey as she wanted to get hers fixed as well. Through recommendations of a few Balinese friends, we made an appointment with Berlin Tattoo and as we are friends of his friends, he made special arrangement to drop by our hotel so we don't have to waste time getting stuck in traffic to go to his parlour.


The design I had in mind for years is one that reflects on the Ying & Yang, it represents the balance of power. Both are the Buddhist Symbols which refers to two spirits so wildly different and yet at the same time similar mortal enemies intricately linked together by destiny. It represents both the 'Hard' and the 'Soft' style of power. Able to guess what the design I wanted to go with based on those clues?


It was this, the Dragon vs Tiger. The tiger represents the hard style as it attacks bulldozing the opponent, while the dragon represents the soft style with more patience and wisdom. Neither of them are able to conquer the other which makes them worthy opponents. So the tattoo/art represents the balance of both styles similar to how Yin-Yang represents the harmony attained through the balance of opposing forces.


It took Berlin quick work in getting the tattoo done, I've friends telling me that despite the intricacies and small size, it'll take at least 2 hours to get the ink in. But from the time he got to my hotel room, to getting things ready, showing me all the new needles he is using, tracing my design out and marking them on my body, to eventually putting the ink and telling me All Done!, Only 45 minutes! Yup, all those steps in such a short time. And I was expecting to sit there for hours with him jabbing me with needles.

From Art to Tattoo...

Funny part was, I didn't know he even started until le Wifey took a photo and showed me when it's almost done. Was told by Berlin that my skin was easy to work with and the best part is, because I didn't feel any pain, he could do quick work without any interruptions (except for the occasional gasp and curses, but that's due to me dying in PUBG Mobile that affected my ranking points).


The final result can only be seen 2 weeks after the tattoo was done, after all the dead skins got peeled off (I couldn't scratch them off and had to let the skin fall off by itself). Am definitely happy with the results, the little shading and added details gave the tattoo a beautiful feel.

Would I get another? Maybe.... if I can think of a new design that I want to translate into tattoo.

Do you have a tattoo? Comment below, tell me about your experience!

70th anniversary of the Malayan Emergency

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the Emergency, a 12-year war declared by the then British colonial power against the insurgent anti-colonial forces led by the Communist Party of Malaya.
It is not a well-publicised fact that the Central Committee of the CPM launched the armed struggle only in December 1948, six months after the declaration of State of Emergency by the British colonial government in June.
Surprisingly, there has been no commemoration of this anti-colonial struggle by the Government or our local universities, leaving it to civil society to remind the country of this fateful turn of our peoples’ history.
It is hoped that in the “new” Malaysia, Malaysian historical facts can be set in perspective so that the new generation understands the class forces that were arraigned during the anti-colonial struggle, know who the real anti-colonial fighters were and the structure of the Merdeka Agreement that was in keeping with British colonial strategy.
Five key questions about Malaysian history
This alternative history poses 5 key questions for Malaysians today:
  1. Who were the patriots who fought to liberate the country from the British colonial power and the Japanese fascists during WWII and who were the pretenders?
  2. Which parties stood for genuine and inclusive multi-ethnicity?
  3. How would the nation have developed if the “People’s Constitution” of the AMCJA-PUTERA coalition had been adopted?
  4. What is the so-called “Social Contract” we have today and was it the same at Independence?
  5. How did the pattern of communalist politics that has plagued Malaysia for so long come about?
The most complete record yet compiled on the Emergency (1948-60) was written by British academic Anthony Short, commissioned by the Malayan Government and given full access to confidential and secret papers. When his finished manuscript was handed over in October 1968, Short had to wait three years before being told that it was not to be published!
Official history of Emergency banned by government
Nevertheless, his work “The Communist Insurrection in Malaya, 1948-60” was eventually published in 1975 while Short was senior lecturer at Aberdeen University. For many years, this book was banned in Malaysia.
Isn’t it time we had an official explanation of why Anthony Short’s commissioned history of the Emergency was rejected by the government?
On this 70th anniversary of the Emergency, is it not time for Malaysians to read Short’s book and for the 70-year secret documents to be declassified for the benefit of scholars and other Malaysians?
Isn’t it time the country properly acknowledges the contributions of the patriotic class forces in all the ethnic communities to Independence and nation building?
Who were the main opponents of the British colonial power and who put up a protracted struggle to end the exploitation of the country’s natural and human resources while forging a truly multi-ethnic peoples’ united front?
The Umno leadership after the Second World War represented the interests of the Malay aristocracy. They were by no means anti-colonial and did not challenge British interests.
The workers’ movement was the main threat to colonial interests and the Federation of Malaya proposals culminating in the Merdeka Agreement were intended to deflect the working-class revolt by introducing communalism in the Independence package.
Alliance Party was a neo-colonial solution for the aristocracy and capitalists
Any history textbook on the Emergency has to include the history of Malayan workers’ struggles that has been so well written by M.R. Stenson.
The Emergency was as much a crackdown on the workers’ movement as it was a war against the anti-colonial insurrection.
The subsequent “Alliance Formula” comprising the Malay aristocratic class and non-Malay capitalist class was designed to deal with the workers’ revolt and put in place a neo-colonial solution. Thus, the ‘Alliance (racial) Formula’ with all its contradictions was devised in Independent Malaya.
The so-called “Social Contract” would have looked very different if the “Peoples’ Constitution” of the AMCJA-PUTERA coalition representing the workers, peasantry and disenchanted middle class had won the day.
The Malay Nationalist Party (MNP) called for, among other things: the right to self-determination of the Malayan people; equal rights for all ethnic communities; freedom of speech, press, meeting, religion; improving standard of living of all the people; improving farming conditions and abolishing land tax; improving labour conditions; education reform on democratic lines; fostering friendly inter-ethnic relations.
People’s Constitution from the anti-colonial movement
The anti-colonial movement demanded self-government and their AMCJA-PUTERA coalition put forward their “Peoples’ Constitutional Proposals”.
Imagine what our nation would have become had this “People’s Constitution” been the federal constitution at Independence.
This coalition encapsulated a more genuine multi-ethnic approach compared to the “communal formula” of the Alliance that was made up of racially-based parties and fraught with contradictions from the start.
The component parties in the Alliance (now the Barisan Nasional) were unashamedly racial and have been dominated by Umno from the start.
The Prime Minister in the “new” Malaysia does not see the incongruence in heading a racially defined “Parti Pribumi”.
These race-based parties would find it difficult to justify themselves if there was an Equality Act or if Malaysia ratified the International Convention on the Eradication of Racial Discrimination.
The Malayan workers’ movement and radical intelligentsia in the anti-colonial coalition of AMCJA-PUTERA displayed strong organisation, solidarity and inter-ethnic unity and this history is a source of inspiration and a model of genuine multi-ethnic cooperation for Malaysians today.
Through this struggle, they developed an awareness of nationalism and anti-imperialism and the socialist road to egalitarian development.
British communalist strategy to dive and rule
The British colonial power used its communalist strategy to divide this anti-colonial movement using the issue of citizenship for the Non-Malays and reneging on the promises of civil equality for all. What would it have been like if all Malayans had been granted genuine civil liberties and political equality?
The anti-colonial movement was defeated largely because the Malay peasantry had been isolated from the movement, buffered from capitalist exploitation in the estates, factories and other urban industries. The colonial state did not hesitate to use crude racial and religious propaganda against the movement.
If Malaysia is to have a viable future and a new agenda for change involving all Malaysians, we must demand a fair, socially just, equal and democratic country that respects human rights and breaks through to a people-centred non-racial agenda for change.
And when we do, imagine how much we will be able to celebrate at the 100-year anniversary of the Malayan Emergency?
Kua Kia Soong is adviser to Suaram.

Work Place Bullying | What can you do?


Currently, a friend is being harassed at work with the Head of Department and Directors unable to do anything about it even though they know it is clear cut bullying. That's the purpose for this post, what can you do to resolve this issue?

What most of us do not realise is the fact that there are various forms of harassments that we should start taking note of. Unfortunately, as far as Malaysian laws are concerned, the authorities only pay attention to sexual misconduct under the Employment Act. Other forms of aggressions have lesser attention in the eyes of the local legal system, but there are several existing laws that can be leveraged upon if the cases are serious.

Some scenarios are easy enough to be handled on your own. For example, if your colleague is always standing too close to you or are all touchy-feely, you can move away or make it very clear to them that you need your personal space through your body language.

Sometimes, confronting a co-worker if he or she is being a nuisance just once, will put an end to their antics. But if the matter persists, always seek your supervisor’s advice first. If that doesn’t help, approach your management. When those two don’t work, then move out to seek professional or legal help. This is because, most of the time harassment issues are isolated and can be resolved within the organisation.

Let’s take a look at the different forms of workplace nuisance that fall under the category of harassment.

1 Sexual harassment


This is undoubtedly the most common form of harassment discussed. Sexual harassment can be anything demeaning, offensive, suggestive or lewd to the opposite gender. Most cases in Malaysia involve female victims, but male victims are not unheard of.

Sexual harassment can take the form of verbal, non-verbal, psychological and physical. It can vary from jokes and jesting, to inappropriate touching or sharing of images on the surface level. Action can be taken against organisations that fail to act on complaints of sexual harassment from employees.

According to section 81F of the Employment Act 1955, an employer who fails to inquire into complaints of sexual harassment; inform the complainant of the refusal and reasons behind it; or, submit a report of the inquiry, can be fined up to RM10,000.

2 Threats, disruptive behaviours or misconduct


E-mails and phone calls that can be considered a threat, disturbing behaviour that disrupts the working process, and unnecessary pressuring of workers or co-workers that are serious to cause extreme physical, mental or emotional discomfort, can be considered as a form of harassment.

Keep a clear note of the five Ws and one H (who, what, when, where, why and how) because the last thing you want your management to do is to view your case as a non-threat.

3 Bullying


This term refers to acts of calling names, spreading rumours, damaging of personal properties, harmful or violent physical contact like fights, slapping and punching or non-sexual physical or verbal abuse.

Cyberbullying among colleagues, serious temper tantrums and unfair treatment by the supervisor, abuse of authority, open humiliation, and coercion to perform a task, can fall under the category of bullying.

In the United States, UK, Canada and other countries, action can be taken against co-workers or employers who resort to such acts.

Unfortunately, there is no legislation governing this portion of workplace harassment in Malaysia, but there are possibilities of victims taking action under the Defamation Act 1957.

They can also file a report for constructive dismissal and compensation with the Industrial Court if there are relevant and sufficient proof to convict the harasser.

4 Discriminative harassment


Exhibition of hostile behaviors centred on one’s beliefs, religion, skin colour, sexual orientation and disabilities, can also be demotivating and demeaning. Worse, it could result in extreme tension and unhealthy work environment.

Again, countries like the United States and Canada would not hesitate to act against co-workers or employers who discriminate based on these sentiments or social values.

There are no particular laws here in Malaysia to address such issues, but avenues that can be considered under the Penal Code include intimidation if the matter becomes a criminal case. Other labour laws which include unfair discrimination can also be considered.

Gender discrimination does carry some weight and is viewed more seriously as gender equality is a constitutional right. Gone are the days where this scenario only applies to women.

What can employees do?


1 Take action


Be bold and file a complaint or make that meeting with your human resources (HR) personnel happen if you are facing any form of harassment. Don’t underestimate your ability to change things, even if you are alone in your journey.

Follow up with your HR department if the matter is being investigated or if action will be taken. Suppose your HR department fails to provide you a satisfactory answer—after numerous attempts—have the courage to seek legal advice or make a police report if the matter is serious.

2 Speak to someone


The last thing you want to do is remain quiet about such issues like sexual harassment and bullying. By speaking to trustworthy colleagues, you are not only helping to address the matter, but may open up a can of worms which is a good thing in this situation. For all you know, you may have helped other people in the process.

You could also speak to your supervisor (if he or she isn’t directly involved) to rally some support or deliberate on ideas to tackle less threatening issues like emotional blackmailing or disruptive behaviours.

3 Know your rights


Read up. Have basic knowledge on labour, employment and management laws. It will help you determine your next course of action if you or your colleagues are affected. Knowing your rights is always a good thing even if your workplace is devoid of harassment issues.

4 Don't publicise the matter on social media


This could backfire on you. Apart from it breaching the code of ethics or your employment contract (when you share internal issues that could possibly compromise your company’s credentials), you are also opening up possibilities of lawsuits if the matter becomes public.

No doubt you will garner support from family and friends but professionally, it may do more harm than good.


What can management do?


Harassment issues can be minor but they have a tendency to grow out of proportion if no proper attention is given. It is the job of the HR management to ensure that the workplace is harassment-free. There are ample steps that the management can take to arrest this issue:

1 Have a strong complaints or suggestions box


Management should take this avenue seriously. Most employees, particularly those who are modest or reserved, will find it extremely difficult to share their situations openly.

Most workers may think that the management will always take the side of other management staff (in harassment scenarios that involve higher management personnel) and would be apprehensive in filing a complaint.

It is therefore important for management and HR divisions to be as welcoming as possible or let the employees know that they can be easily approached for personal discussions.

2 Take action


Yes, it takes time and effort, but it helps maintain a healthy environment when management takes action against complaints of harassment of any form. This also maintains the trust of your employees.

3 Be transparent, but protect complainants' information


Harassed victims need to feel protected and they can only rely on management to back them up if they are victimised in any situation. Management should let employees know that they can seek your advice and that their identities will be protected.

It’s not easy to work in an environment where the “harasser” and the “harassed” meet eye-to-eye all the time. Being transparent about such processes can help ease any form of hostility and maintain workplace harmony.

4 Have guidelines or code of ethics


Every organisation generally has ethics and rules for various employment aspects in place. Remind everyone from time to time about these guidelines and let them know that you do view harassment cases, whether sexual or otherwise, seriously and will not hesitate to take action, amounting to dismissal or other forms of legal address.

5 Have an in-house or external counsellor


This may sound like an additional cost but it may be necessary from time to time. If issues of harassment get out of control, your workers can suffer from psychological and emotional distress. If these issues are not addressed professionally, it can affect productivity and the employees’ mental health.

In addition, having a counsellor can help address problems especially if the nature of your business is highly stressful.

Photos | KK Latin Kiz Escapade 2018


The KK Latin Kiz' Escapade 2018 was held over the last weekend of June in the heart of Kota Kinabalu with an amazing turn-out despite being a small event (if compared to the bigger festivals around Kuala Lumpur). Amazing atmosphere with a fantastic organizing team that is on top of everything. Taking care of us from the time we touched down til us leaving.

Here's the photos from the 3 amazing nights of dancing and 2 days of fantastic workshops.


Workshops | Day 1 & 2



Party | Casual Friday



Party | Prom Night



Party | World Cup Night



That's all the collection for this festival, looking forward to the next festival to bring more wonderful visuals to all. If you would like to engage my service for your upcoming event, do drop me a message and we can discuss further from there.

Fragility of Cryptocurrency


Cryptocurrencies are not scalable and are more likely to suffer a breakdown in trust and efficiency the greater the number of people using them, the Bank of International Settlements (BIS)said on Sunday in its latest warning about the rise of virtual currencies.

For any form of money to work across large networks it requires trust in the stability of its value and in its ability to scale efficiently, the BIS, an umbrella group for the world's central banks, said in its annual report.

But trust can disappear instantly because of the fragility of the decentralized networks on which cryptocurrencies depend, the BIS said.

Those networks are also prone to congestion the bigger they become, according to the BIS, which noted the high transaction fees of the best-known digital currency, bitcoin, and the limited number of transactions per second they can handle.

"Trust can evaporate at any time because of the fragility of the decentralised consensus through which transactions are recorded," the Switzerland-based group said in its report.

"Not only does this call into question the finality of individual payments, it also means that a cryptocurrency can simply stop functioning, resulting in a complete loss of value."

The BIS' head of research, Hyun Song Shin, said sovereign money had value because it had users, but many people holding cryptocurrencies did so often purely for speculative purposes.

"Without users, it would simply be a worthless token. That's true whether it's a piece of paper with a face on it, or a digital token," he said, comparing virtual coins to baseball cards or Tamagotchi.

The dependency of users on so-called miners to record and verify crypto transactions is also flawed, according to the BIS, requiring vast and costly energy use.

It has issued a series of warnings this year after an explosive rise in cryptocurrency values attracted a wave of followers.

Agustin Carstens, general manager of the BIS, has described bitcoin as "a combination of a bubble, a Ponzi scheme and an environmental disaster".

The BIS has told central banks to think hard about the potential risks before issuing their own cryptocurrencies.

No central bank has issued a digital currency, though the Riksbank in Sweden, where the use of cash has fallen, is studying a retail e-krona for small payments.

The BIS also said in its annual report that effective regulation of digital coins needed to be global, targeting both regulated financial institutions as well as companies offering crypto-related services.

Grandparents Medical Advices that are lies


Growing up, we all experienced it (especially the Asian families), when we get sick or did something our grandmother doesn't like, she will throw out some medical "Facts" that makes us set things right faster than a lightning strike.

Did you experienced similar "advice" from your grandparents? Comment below and let me know what is the most common ones you get from your grandparents.

The following list explains the myths that just won’t seem to die.

Lie #1: “If you swallow chewing gum, it will never leave your body”

There are many variations of this myth. There are versions that specify the number of years it remains stuck in the body. There are those that say the gum gets stuck to the walls of your digestive system.

FACT: The gum will pass through your system and be excreted. Since it cannot be digested, it will come out whole as it was when it was swallowed. The chemicals that you cannot digest are those that give the gum its rubbery quality. But having said that, it’s not a good idea to swallow large amounts of gum anyway as there are cases of kids suffering from severe constipation after having swallowed too much gum.

Lie #2: “If you sit on a pillow, a boil will grow on your butt.”

This one is a Malaysian staple. In Bahasa Melayu it goes: “Kalau duduk atas bantal nanti punggung berbisul”.

This doesn’t make sense at any level but because it’s a scary enough thought, we still avoid planting ourselves on cushy pillows. A hundred years ago someone probably had some very nice pillows she didn’t want anyone sitting on and thought, “Why not scare the crap out of kids to stop them from squishing my pillows?”

FACT: A boil is an infected hair follicle. Technically, sitting on filthy pillows could cause boils but only if you did it buck naked.

Lie #3: “If you shave, your hair grows back thicker”

Nope, it doesn’t. It only looks that way. This might be right for the pubescent boy but only because puberty is making him more hairy. The act of shaving however, doesn’t contribute to thicker hair growth.

FACT: What might explain this phenomenon that many still swear by is that after shaving, stubbles appear which give the appearance of thick hair. However, once these stubbles start to grow out, it will be the same thickness as the hair before it.

Lie #4: “Eating watermelon seeds can cause appendicitis”

Appendicitis occurs when you have an infection of the appendix, which can be caused when debris is lodged in the tube-shaped sac. So, this “lie” should make sense, right?

FACT: Well, the answer is maybe. Some studies show there is a negligible correlation between swallowing fruit seeds and the onset of appendicitis. However, these studies do have their shortcomings as well. Therefore, it may be best to err on the side of caution and refrain from swallowing seeds. They don’t taste nice anyway. And definitely, don’t swallow durian seeds!

Lie #5: “Don’t give that kid candy or he will get a sugar rush.”

This is the biggest myth as many parents swear sugar is the culprit behind the hyperactivity of their toddlers.

FACT: This “sugar rush” state is simply not real. But it is still not a good idea to feed your kids too much sugar. Sugar addiction is a real threat to health and the rate of obesity among children and adults today is testimony to this. So, this just might be one of those white lies that we should keep alive.

Lie #6: “Chocolate gives you acne.”

Although this is a lie, don’t go grabbing that bar of Cadbury just yet. While previous studies have shown chocolate doesn’t cause acne, dermatologists point the finger at the sugar and fat content of chocolate, saying these ingredients can cause pimples. But this too has come under heavy criticism although subsequent studies show there just may be a link.

FACT: The jury is still out. Common sense says that if you experience a breakout after indulging in way too many Kinder Buenos, it’d be best to avoid them.

Lie #7: “Men don’t get breast cancer.”

This is a relatively modern myth. While the pink ribbon campaign to increase breast cancer awareness among women has been a success, men still often ignore early warning signs and are diagnosed only when the cancer is at an advanced stage.

FACT: Men also have breast tissue and after puberty develop ducts, lobules and connective tissues just like their female counterparts. The only difference is that women develop far more of these than men ever do. Even so, the male species can still get the same disease.

Lie #8: Vaccines can cause autism

This is a dangerous lie.

FACT: Vaccines do not cause autism. Vaccines not only protect the person who is vaccinated, but through the effect of herd immunity, has the power to eradicate diseases. No one who has been vaccinated has ever contracted polio and it would be a serious failure on the part of medical science if polio ever came back.

Lie #9: “Humans only use 10% of their brains.”

There’s a reason why people like this lie so much – it gives them some comfort that they actually have hidden potential.

FACT: Brain scans show that we use our whole brain pretty much most of the time. In fact our brain as a single organ consumes a high amount of energy given its relatively small size.

So how many of the above "advices" have you heard from your grandparents or aunties?

Want to know more?

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MICHAEL YIP
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Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia