MICHAEL YIP

I AM A

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Hello,

I'm Michael Yip

I am a video producer and photographer by profession. As a photographer, one of my core skills is in dance event photography, as one of only a handful of photographers experienced in covering dance events, performances and portraits. I got a chance to countries around the Asian region capturing visuals to help participants of the events immortalize their moments. If you are interested in bringing me over to your festivals/events. Just head over to the contact section and drop me a message.

Through GEMNUINE - the idea co., my team and I also provides Brand Management and PR services. Our core expertise is in helping brands evolve and attract the current market. We also provides Digital Marketing and Management services, from web designs to social media management. Drop me an email today at mike@gemnuine.com and let us know how you want us to help you.

If you are stumped by the photo, yes, I dance as well, mainly Salsa, Bachata, Kizomba, West Coast Swing and Argentine Tango. I have since stopped performing due to injuries but if you are looking for performers for corporate events/functions/parties/festivals. Do drop me a message as well as I manages some of the dance teams that is currently making the rounds performing for various clients.


Education
Kolej Bandar Utama/Central St. Martin

Diploma in Arts and Design

Kolej Damansara Utama

Diploma in Telecommunication Engineering

SMK Damansara Utama

SPM


Experience
Photographer/Video Producer

MIKE YIP STUDIO

Branding and PR

GEMNUINE - the idea co.

Digital Marketing Solutions

Abood Media Sdn Bhd


My Skills
Photography and Video Production
Brand Management and Solutions
Public Relations
Digital Marketing Solutions

14

Confirmed Bookings for 2018

4

Confirmed Destinations for 2018

6

Confirmed Dance Festivals for 2018

4

Talks Confirmed for 2018

WHAT CAN MY TEAM DO

Photography and Video Production

As our core business, this is what we are good at, capturing visuals that brings out the best for your brand.

Branding and PR

Through GEMNUINE, we specializes in helping brands redevelop, redefine and create a comprehensive marketing strategies reach the target market.

Social Media Marketing

Abood Media Sdn Bhd's core strenght in Digital Marketing Services focuses on Social Media Management and promotions.

Web Design

We also design and revamp websites as part of Abood Media Sdn Bhd's services.

Live Event Streaming Production

As part of a new offering from MIKE YIP STUDIO and partners, we also provides Live Streaming services for Events through dedicated sites or onto social media platforms.

Efficient

We pride ourselves at being good and efficient in what we do and we always try our best to deliver services that exceeds our client's expectations.

I also blogs

Happy Chinese New Year!


Who says Muslims can’t vote for non-Muslim leaders?


Malaysia is a multicultural and multi-confessional country whose official religion is Islam. The country’s constitution allows Muslims and non-Muslims to be represented in Parliament for harmonious governance. There is no rule as agreed on in the constitution stipulating that a Muslim cannot vote for a non-Muslim representative or vice- versa. It is this judicious system that has made democracy work in the country.

Under the constitution, while Islam is the official religion, followers of other beliefs are allowed to practise their faiths without hindrance. The elected government, on its part, comprises leaders from various religious and racial backgrounds, without religion encroaching into worldly state affairs.

Unfortunately, some local clerics have fallen into the pit of fixation and fanaticism for the sake of political gain. They do not hesitate to give speeches based on their own interpretation of religion, that “Muslims cannot choose a non-Muslim leader”. This is unacceptable when it comes to state matters in our democracy.

It may be religiously correct when related solely to matters of faith, but not when it involves state matters. Obviously, the state cannot appoint a non-Muslim to look into the religious affairs of Muslims – the appointment of a mufti, for instance.

Quoting verses from the holy book and interpreting them according to their whims to justify their decree for political expediency may not always be right. It has been recognised by Islamic scholars that even though sacred texts contain holy words, their interpretation and application are human acts that can be debated and transmuted in an inclusive manner. These give-and-take dynamics were found even in the earliest days of Islamic civilisation. In choosing a leader to deal with state matters, it’s espoused in Islam that the person should have the trust and capability to deal with the tasks given to him or her.

Unfortunately, this discourse on the “divine and the human” seems embroiled in confusion among some clerics, which has resulted in religion usurping or rescinding the wisdom of the people. They seem to promulgate intolerance of others in a multi-religious society, and this could even lead to supreme authorisation.

In this age of democracy, we should not be faced with the dilemma of whether a Muslim is allowed to choose a leader who is not a Muslim. Neither should it be the other way around – whether non-Muslims are allowed to choose a Muslim as their leader.

People of a single race or religion should not dictate who should lead the country. In a democracy, we have the right to choose the candidate whom we believe is best qualified for the post.

For Muslim thinkers, Islam is seen as compatible with modern secular democracies. Clerics who think otherwise are not keeping up with modern times and the reality of the world we live in today. These clerics feel that they are bound by the Al-Maidah verse 5:51 of the Quran that, according to their interpretation, “forbids Muslims to associate with or vote for non-Muslims”. And they argue that “there is no precedence of choosing a non-Muslim leader” during the Caliph era.

However, they stop short at that to confuse the masses. They fail to convince the people that many Muslims at the time, especially those originally from Medina, had strong bonds with people from non-Muslim tribes, dating back even before Islam as well as during the khilafah rule.

“Allah does not forbid you from showing kindness and dealing justly with those who have not fought you due to your faith or driven you out of your homes. Allah loves those who deal justly. Allah only forbids you from those people that fought you because of your faith, drove you out of your homes and helped in your expulsion, that you take them as intimate associates. And whosoever takes them as intimate associates, then it is they who are the wrongdoers.” (Quran, 60:8-9)

This verse should set the tone for how we see verse 5:51, which has often been misused to claim that Islam orders Muslims not to have any sort of good relations with non-Muslims at all, an interpretation which is refuted by the above verse in the Quran.

Scholars have argued over this interpretation of the verse, saying the verse was revealed and was only applicable during the time of wars and enemies, when the non-Muslims tried to suppress the Muslims. This is never the case in the present context where Muslims and non-Muslims are not at war with each other.

Don’t be reclusive in thought

In the present democracy, there is a separation between state and religion in a country like Malaysia, for instance. The state in general does not have the authority to intervene in religious matters, unlike the caliphs and Islamic leaders of the past. In fact, the concept of “state” did not even exist in the seventh century. They were the least sophisticated as they had only loosely knit tribal forms of administration until the advent of the Ottoman Empire (c. 1299 –1920).

In Malaysia, religion comes under the authority of individual state rulers. At the federal level, the government only provides a governing body on religious affairs under an appointed minister who, in this case, has to be Muslim. Jakim was thus established in 1997, but even this measure was an afterthought, implemented when leaders saw the unending controversies miring the religious teachings in the country. The leaders of all these religious bodies are appointed from among Muslims.

Muslims should be wise enough not to be in reclusive in thought when confronted by skewed clerics. Supporting non-Muslim candidates in a democracy where there is a separation of state and religion cannot be considered a wrong act for Muslims. Historical precedence based on isolated events of the past does not hold water in the context of modern democracy.

In fact, in Islam there is no absolute model for political rule. The Islamic form of government depends on the circumstances. Government, according to Islam, will be decided by the circumstances. According to Islam, a political form is not a part of belief. They are separate entities. This is where some obsessive clerics are confused in their approach to Islam. It is always the prevailing situation that will determine the type of political form that has to be adopted. This is what democracy is.

In Islamic history, the modest administrative form adopted after the Prophet was based on khilafah. It was not an absolute form, though. Later on, the dynastic model of administration was adopted. The models set by other Prophets are also an Islamic model. This is because the Quran accepts all messengers as models as mentioned in the Quran (6:90): “Those [the previous prophets] were the people whom God guided. Follow their guidance then and say, I ask no reward for this from you: it is only a reminder for all mankind.”

The democratic model of today

Following this principle, the democratic model of today is also an accepted model in Islam. This is supported by the following verse of the Quran: “… and their affairs are by counsel among themselves” (42:38). According to these precedents, if voters elect a non-Muslim leader it would be considered a right choice according to Islam. In the Malaysian context, there is no prohibition on elected Muslim and non-Muslim leaders who are not adversaries in the social and political sense having mutual consultation and working in tandem for the people and the betterment of the nation.

It would not be regarded as a wrongful choice or a sin for Muslims to work with or choose leaders from among the non-Muslims. Hopefully, those clerics in PAS will stop distorting the message of Islam to confuse the people just to seek political power. In fact, this act of theirs is debauchery and against Islam.

In Islam, political form is not related to belief. For instance, the government does not have a set form as does a religious ritual, such as steps and ways to perform the haj or prayers. Governance is related to circumstances or practical insights that are flexible and can vary with time and according to the wishes of the people. It’s the quests for real-world intuitions that will decide the form of government to be adopted in a democracy. The values adopted by leaders and in governance, however, can indirectly be consonant with the universal values found in Islam as well as other religions, such as being knowledgeable, competent, honest and trustworthy.

by Moaz Nair

Your conduct reflects on your company


FREEDOM of expression is recognized and the Internet has provided the tool for individuals to express their opinions and views.

However, this recognized right should be exercised sparingly and not abused or misused. Abuse of the freedom of expression may expose the individual to civil and criminal liability.

In the sphere of employment relations, an employee is expected to uphold the company’s good name and image. Any conduct of an employee at the workplace which is likely to damage the reputation of the employer may constitute misconduct and will lead to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. Likewise, an employee’s outside workplace activities may trigger disciplinary action when the wrongful conduct of the employee damages the company’s reputation or brings the company into public disrepute.

Hence, an employee should avoid making insensitive or defamatory remarks against the company or others on social media as such conduct or action has the potential of bringing the company into odium and disrepute in the minds of right-thinking members of society.

The situation includes when an employee publishes derogatory statements online against an individual or authority. In the aforesaid circumstances, the termination is warranted as their continued employment would pose a risk to the employer’s reputation.

Recently, several employees of local companies came under fire for insulting Sultan Muhammad V when he stepped down as the Yang di-Pertuan Agong.

Earlier, a local automobile dealer dismissed its employee over her insensitive Facebook remark about the death of the firefighter Muhammad Adib Mohd Kassim.

Although the act was committed outside the workplace, such conduct has implications on the employer’s goodwill and reputation with a high possibility of the public shunning the employer for retaining such ill-manned employees. It is noteworthy that the employment relationship is built on mutual trust and confidence that calls for an employee to uphold the company’s reputation at all times.

In short, an employee ought to take heed of the repercussions arising from sending fake news to public websites or posting information that is defamatory of others even if such action is done outside the workplace and work hours.

by ASHGAR ALI ALI MOHAMED
Ahmad Ibrahim Kulliyyah of Laws
International Islamic University Malaysia

An update on Yayasan Kanser Malaysia

As some of you that follows me on the various social media channels know, I've recently been engaged to assist Yayasan Kanser Malaysia on top of my own projects. And as we sat down and go through all the stuff that is with YKM, we found out that there's many out there that claims to be part of YKM and going around applying for loans and grants using forged documents.


So I'm putting it out here now, to let everyone know that there's only 1 actual Yayasan Kanser Malaysia, on the internet, you can find them via:

Website: http://www.yayasankansermalaysia.org
Facebook: http://www.fb.com/yayasankanser
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/yayasankanser
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/yayasankanser
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/yayasankanser

For verification, please always check with the Suruhanjanaya Syarikat Malaysia (SSM) on the Updated Board of Directors list for Yayasan Kanser Malaysia.

If you have come across anyone/team that goes around indicating they are from YKM, please inform the foundation at info@yayasankansermalaysia.org and inform the nearest police station regarding the fraud. All emails correspondent, as far as I know, will only come from @yayasankansermalaysia.org OR yayasankanser@gmail.com

If you'd like any further clarification, do contact them at the emails stated or you can message me on Facebook at http://m.me/mikeyipdotcom

Will update more as time progress, looking at what YKM has planned up for 2019, I am excited to be part of the adventure.

Happy Diwali to all

Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad addresses UN General Assembly



Madam President,

I would like to join others in congratulating you on your election as the President of the Seventy-Third (73rd) Session of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA).

I am confident with your wisdom and vast experience; this session will achieve the objectives of the theme for this session. I assure you of Malaysia's fullest support and cooperation towards achieving these noble goals.

Allow me to also pay tribute to your predecessor, His Excellency Miroslav Lajcak, for his dedication and stewardship in successfully completing the work of the 72nd Session of the General Assembly.

I commend the Secretary-General and the United Nations staff for their tireless efforts in steering and managing UN activities globally.

In particular, I pay tribute to the late Kofi Annan, the seventh Secretary-General of the UN from 1997 – 2006, who sadly passed away in August this year. Malaysia had a positively strong and active engagement with the UN during his tenure.

Madam President,

The theme of this 73rd Session of General Assembly, "Making the United Nations Relevant to All People: Global Leadership and Shared Responsibilities for Peaceful, Equitable and Sustainable Societies" remains true to the aspiration of our founding fathers. The theme is most relevant and timely. It is especially pertinent in the context of the new Malaysia. The new Government of Malaysia, recently empowered with a strong mandate from its people, is committed to ensure that every Malaysian has an equitable share in the prosperity and wealth of the nation.

A new Malaysia emerged after the 14th General Election in May this year. Malaysians decided to change their government, which had been in power for 61 years, i.e., since independence. We did this because the immediate past Government indulged in the politics of hatred, of racial and religious bigotry, as well as widespread corruption. The process of change was achieved democratically, without violence or loss of lives.

Malaysians want a new Malaysia that upholds the principles of fairness, good governance, integrity and the rule of law. They want a Malaysia that is a friend to all and enemy of none. A Malaysia that remains neutral and non-aligned. A Malaysia that detests and abhors wars and violence. They also want a Malaysia that will speak its mind on what is right and wrong, without fear or favour. A new Malaysia that believes in co-operation based on mutual respect, for mutual gain. The new Malaysia that offers a partnership based on our philosophy of 'prosper-thy-neighbour'. We believe in the goodness of cooperation, that a prosperous and stable neighbour would contribute to our own prosperity and stability.

The new Malaysia will firmly espouse the principles promoted by the UN in our international engagements. These include the principles of truth, human rights, the rule of law, justice, fairness, responsibility and accountability, as well as sustainability. It is within this context that the new government of Malaysia has pledged to ratify all remaining core UN instruments related to the protection of human rights. It will not be easy for us because Malaysia is multi-ethnic, multireligious, multicultural and multilingual. We will accord space and time for all to deliberate and to decide freely based on democracy.



Madam President,

When I last spoke here in 2003, I lamented how the world had lost its way. I bemoaned the fact that small countries continued to be at the mercy of the powerful. I argued the need for the developing world to push for reform, to enhance capacity building and diversify the economy. We need to maintain control of our destiny.

But today, 15 years later the world has not changed much. If at all the world is far worse than 15 years ago. Today the world is in a state of turmoil economically, socially and politically.

There is a trade war going on between the two most powerful economies. And the rest of the world feel the pain.

Socially new values undermine the stability of nations and their people. Freedom has led to the negation of the concept of marriage and families, of moral codes, of respect etc.

But the worse turmoil is in the political arena. We are seeing acts of terror everywhere. People are tying bombs to their bodies and blowing themselves up in crowded places. Trucks are driven into holiday crowds. Wars are fought and people beheaded with short knives. Acts of brutality are broadcast to the world live. Masses of people risk their lives to migrate only to be denied asylum, sleeping in the open and freezing to death. Thousands starve and tens of thousands die in epidemics of cholera.

No one, no country is safe. Security checks inconvenience travellers. No liquids on planes. The slightest suspicion leads to detention and unpleasant questioning.

To fight the "terrorists" all kinds of security measures, all kinds of gadgets and equipment are deployed. Big brother is watching. But the acts of terror continues.

Malaysia fought the bandits and terrorists at independence and defeated them. We did use the military. But alongside and more importantly we campaigned to win the hearts of minds of these people.

This present war against the terrorist will not end until the root causes are found and removed and hearts and minds are won.

What are the root causes? In 1948, Palestinian land was seized to form the state of Israel. The Palestinians were massacred and forced to leave their land. Their houses and farms were seized.

They tried to fight a conventional war with help from sympathetic neighbours. The friends of Israel ensured this attempt failed. More Palestinian land was seized. And Israeli settlements were built on more and more Palestinian land and the Palestinians are denied access to these settlements built on their land.

The Palestinians initially tried to fight with catapults and stones. They were shot with live bullets and arrested. Thousands are incarcerated.

Frustrated and angry, unable to fight a conventional war, the Palestinians resort to what we call terrorism.

The world does not care even when Israel breaks international laws, seizing ships carrying medicine, food and building materials in international waters. The Palestinians fired ineffective rockets which hurt no one. Massive retaliations were mounted by Israel, rocketing and bombing hospitals, schools and other buildings, killing innocent civilians including school children and hospital patients. And more.

The world rewards Israel, deliberately provoking Palestine by recognising Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

It is the anger and frustration of the Palestinians and their sympathisers that cause them to resort to what we call terrorism. But it is important to acknowledge that any act which terrify people also constitute terrorism. And states dropping bombs or launching rockets which maim and kill innocent people also terrify people. These are also acts of terrorism.

Malaysia hates terrorism. We will fight them. But we believe that the only way to fight terrorism is to remove the cause. Let the Palestinians return to reclaim their land. Let there be a state of Palestine. Let there be justice and the rule of law. Warring against them will not stop terrorism. Nor will out-terrorising them succeed.

We need to remind ourselves that the United Nations Organisation, like the League of Nations before, was conceived for the noble purpose of ending wars between nations.

Wars are about killing people. Modern wars are about mass killings and total destruction countrywide. Civilised nations claim they abhor killing for any reason. When a man kills, he commits the crime of murder. And the punishment for murder may be death.

But wars, we all know encourage and legitimise killing. Indeed the killings are regarded as noble, and the killers are hailed as heroes. They get medals stuck to their chest and statues erected in their honour, have their names mentioned in history books.

There is something wrong with our way of thinking, with our value system. Kill one man, it is murder, kill a million and you become a hero. And so we still believe that conflict between nations can be resolved with war.

And because we still do, we must prepare for war. The old adage says "to have peace, prepare for war". And we are forever preparing for war, inventing more and more destructive weapons. We now have nuclear bombs, capable of destroying whole cities. But now we know that the radiation emanating from the explosion will affect even the country using the bomb. A nuclear war would destroy the world.

This fear has caused the countries of Europe and North America to maintain peace for over 70 years. But that is not for other countries. Wars in these other countries can help live test the new weapons being invented.

And so they sell them to warring countries. We see their arms in wars fought between smaller countries. These are not world wars but they are no less destructive. Hundreds of thousands of people have been killed, whole countries devastated and nations bankrupted because of these fantastic new weapons.

But these wars give handsome dividends to the arms manufacturers and traders. The arms business is now the biggest business in the world. They profit shamelessly from the deaths and destructions they cause. Indeed, so-called peace-loving countries often promote this shameful business.

Today's weapons cost millions. Fighter jets cost about 100 million dollars. And maintaining them cost tens of millions. But the poor countries are persuaded to buy them even if they cannot afford. They are told their neighbours or their enemies have them. It is imperative that they too have them.

So, while their people starve and suffer from all kinds of deprivations, a huge percentage of their budget is allocated to the purchase of arms. That their buyers may never have to use them bothers the purveyors not at all.

Madam President,

In Myanmar, Muslims in Rakhine state are being murdered, their homes torched and a million refugees had been forced to flee, to drown in the high seas, to live in makeshift huts, without water or food, without the most primitive sanitation. Yet the authorities of Myanmar including a Nobel Peace Laureate deny that this is happening. I believe in non-interference in the internal affairs of nations. But does the world watch massacres being carried out and do nothing? Nations are independent. But does this mean they have a right to massacre their own people, because they are independent?

Madam President,

TRADE

On the other hand, in terms of trade, nations are no longer independent. Free trade means no protection by small countries of their infant industries. They must abandon tariff restrictions and open their countries to invasion by products of the rich and the powerful. Yet the simple products of the poor are subjected to clever barriers so that they cannot penetrate the market of the rich. Malaysian palm oil is labelled as dangerous to health and the estates are destroying the habitat of animals. Food products of the rich declare that they are palm oil free. Now palm diesel are condemned because they are decimating virgin jungles. These caring people forget that their boycott is depriving hundreds of thousands of people from jobs and a decent life.

We in Malaysia care for the environment. Some 48% of our country remains virgin jungle. Can our detractors claim the same for their own countries?

Madam President,

Malaysia is committed to sustainable development. We have taken steps, for example in improving production methods to ensure that our palm oil production is sustainable. By December 2019, the Malaysian Sustainable Palm Oil (MSPO) standard will become mandatory. This will ensure that every drop of palm oil produced in Malaysia will be certified sustainable by 2020.

Madam President,

All around the world, we observe a dangerous trend to inward-looking nationalism, of governments pandering to populism, retreating from international collaborations and shutting their borders to free movements of people, goods and services even as they talk of a borderless world, of free trade. While globalisation has indeed brought us some benefits, the impacts have proven to be threatening to the independence of small nations. We cannot even talk or move around without having our voices and movement recorded and often used against us. Data on everyone is captured and traded by powerful nations and their corporations.

Malaysia lauds the UN in its endeavours to end poverty, protect our planet and try to ensure everyone enjoys peace and prosperity. But I would like to refer to the need for reform in the organisation. Five countries on the basis of their victories 70 over years ago cannot claim to have a right to hold the world to ransom forever. They cannot take the moral high ground, preaching democracy and regime change in the countries of the world when they deny democracy in this organisation.

I had suggested that the veto should not be by just one permanent member but by at least two powers backed by three non-permanent members of the Security Council. The General Assembly should then back the decision with a simple majority. I will not say more.

I must admit that the world without the UN would be disastrous. We need the UN, we need to sustain it with sufficient funds. No one should threaten it with financial deprivation.

Madam President

After 15 years and at 93, I return to this podium with the heavy task of bringing the voice and hope of the new Malaysia to the world stage. The people of Malaysia, proud of their recent democratic achievement, have high hopes that around the world – we will see peace, progress and prosperity. In this we look toward the UN to hear our pleas.

I thank you, Madam President.

New immigration rule for Malaysians travelling to EU countries from 2020


 From year 2020, Malaysians who wish to travel to European Union countries may be required to undergo a new immigration process.

This new immigration process called the European Travel Information and Authorisation System (ETIAS) may become a mandatory requirement for citizens from visa-free countries. More details at the ETIAS website (click here).

According to etiaseurope.eu website, citizens from visa-free countries can stay in the Schengen Area (all EU states except Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland, Romania and The United Kingdom) for a period up to 90 days.

“It is an immigration process used to address the potential threats of ineligible individuals before they can cross the borders of the EU states.

“ETIAS with the Entry–Exit System (EES) will speed up, facilitate, reinforce and modernise the border control procedures by offering better protection against document and identity fraud,” said the website.

Each citizen from the visa-free countries need to hold a valid ETIAS prior to boarding.

“Once issued, a valid authorisation will allow its holder to stay in the Schengen Area for a period of up to 90 days in any 180-day period and it is valid for 3 years from the date of issuance or until the expiry date of the passport, whichever comes first,” it said.

The application process is simple as it can be done online and it was recommended that applicants apply for an ETIAS at least 72 hours prior to departure.

“It only takes up to 10 minutes and only costs RM48.30 (10 Euros). Each individual travelling in a group needs to be authorised.

“However, applicants under the age of 18 do not have to pay the processing fee,” it said.

Among the documentation requirements for this process includes a valid passport issued by a visa-exempt country, a valid credit card to pay the application fee, applicants contact information including the address of permanent residence, phone number and email address.

It also stated that once the application has been submitted online, it would be screened across various systems to determine whether an authorisation could be granted or not.

“If your application is approved, you will receive an authorisation directly by email and in case of denial, you will receive an email explaining the reason for refusal.”

Among the countries which requires ETIAS online authorisation include Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Vatican City State.

My 1st Tattoo


After 40 years on this planet, I finally got my 1st tattoo done when I was in Bali for a dance festival. Of course, this only made possible thanks to the constant pestering by le wifey as she wanted to get hers fixed as well. Through recommendations of a few Balinese friends, we made an appointment with Berlin Tattoo and as we are friends of his friends, he made special arrangement to drop by our hotel so we don't have to waste time getting stuck in traffic to go to his parlour.


The design I had in mind for years is one that reflects on the Ying & Yang, it represents the balance of power. Both are the Buddhist Symbols which refers to two spirits so wildly different and yet at the same time similar mortal enemies intricately linked together by destiny. It represents both the 'Hard' and the 'Soft' style of power. Able to guess what the design I wanted to go with based on those clues?


It was this, the Dragon vs Tiger. The tiger represents the hard style as it attacks bulldozing the opponent, while the dragon represents the soft style with more patience and wisdom. Neither of them are able to conquer the other which makes them worthy opponents. So the tattoo/art represents the balance of both styles similar to how Yin-Yang represents the harmony attained through the balance of opposing forces.


It took Berlin quick work in getting the tattoo done, I've friends telling me that despite the intricacies and small size, it'll take at least 2 hours to get the ink in. But from the time he got to my hotel room, to getting things ready, showing me all the new needles he is using, tracing my design out and marking them on my body, to eventually putting the ink and telling me All Done!, Only 45 minutes! Yup, all those steps in such a short time. And I was expecting to sit there for hours with him jabbing me with needles.

From Art to Tattoo...

Funny part was, I didn't know he even started until le Wifey took a photo and showed me when it's almost done. Was told by Berlin that my skin was easy to work with and the best part is, because I didn't feel any pain, he could do quick work without any interruptions (except for the occasional gasp and curses, but that's due to me dying in PUBG Mobile that affected my ranking points).


The final result can only be seen 2 weeks after the tattoo was done, after all the dead skins got peeled off (I couldn't scratch them off and had to let the skin fall off by itself). Am definitely happy with the results, the little shading and added details gave the tattoo a beautiful feel.

Would I get another? Maybe.... if I can think of a new design that I want to translate into tattoo.

Do you have a tattoo? Comment below, tell me about your experience!

Want to know more?

Contact Us
MICHAEL YIP
fb.com/mikeyipdotcom
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia