MICHAEL YIP

I AM A

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Hello,

I'm Michael Yip

I am a video producer and photographer by profession. As a photographer, one of my core skills is in dance event photography, as one of only a handful of photographers experienced in covering dance events, performances and portraits. I got a chance to countries around the Asian region capturing visuals to help participants of the events immortalize their moments. If you are interested in bringing me over to your festivals/events. Just head over to the contact section and drop me a message.

Through GEMNUINE - the idea co., my team and I also provides Brand Management and PR services. Our core expertise is in helping brands evolve and attract the current market. We also provides Digital Marketing and Management services, from web designs to social media management. Drop me an email today at mike@gemnuine.com and let us know how you want us to help you.

If you are stumped by the photo, yes, I dance as well, mainly Salsa, Bachata, Kizomba, West Coast Swing and Argentine Tango. I have since stopped performing due to injuries but if you are looking for performers for corporate events/functions/parties/festivals. Do drop me a message as well as I manages some of the dance teams that is currently making the rounds performing for various clients.


Education
Kolej Bandar Utama/Central St. Martin

Diploma in Arts and Design

Kolej Damansara Utama

Diploma in Telecommunication Engineering

SMK Damansara Utama

SPM


Experience
Photographer/Video Producer

MIKE YIP STUDIO

Branding and PR

GEMNUINE - the idea co.

Digital Marketing Solutions

Abood Media Sdn Bhd


My Skills
Photography and Video Production
Brand Management and Solutions
Public Relations
Digital Marketing Solutions

14

Confirmed Bookings for 2018

4

Confirmed Destinations for 2018

6

Confirmed Dance Festivals for 2018

4

Talks Confirmed for 2018

WHAT CAN MY TEAM DO

Photography and Video Production

As our core business, this is what we are good at, capturing visuals that brings out the best for your brand.

Branding and PR

Through GEMNUINE, we specializes in helping brands redevelop, redefine and create a comprehensive marketing strategies reach the target market.

Social Media Marketing

Abood Media Sdn Bhd's core strenght in Digital Marketing Services focuses on Social Media Management and promotions.

Web Design

We also design and revamp websites as part of Abood Media Sdn Bhd's services.

Live Event Streaming Production

As part of a new offering from MIKE YIP STUDIO and partners, we also provides Live Streaming services for Events through dedicated sites or onto social media platforms.

Efficient

We pride ourselves at being good and efficient in what we do and we always try our best to deliver services that exceeds our client's expectations.

I also blogs
Showing posts with label Entrepreneur Life. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Entrepreneur Life. Show all posts

Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad addresses UN General Assembly



Madam President,

I would like to join others in congratulating you on your election as the President of the Seventy-Third (73rd) Session of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA).

I am confident with your wisdom and vast experience; this session will achieve the objectives of the theme for this session. I assure you of Malaysia's fullest support and cooperation towards achieving these noble goals.

Allow me to also pay tribute to your predecessor, His Excellency Miroslav Lajcak, for his dedication and stewardship in successfully completing the work of the 72nd Session of the General Assembly.

I commend the Secretary-General and the United Nations staff for their tireless efforts in steering and managing UN activities globally.

In particular, I pay tribute to the late Kofi Annan, the seventh Secretary-General of the UN from 1997 – 2006, who sadly passed away in August this year. Malaysia had a positively strong and active engagement with the UN during his tenure.

Madam President,

The theme of this 73rd Session of General Assembly, "Making the United Nations Relevant to All People: Global Leadership and Shared Responsibilities for Peaceful, Equitable and Sustainable Societies" remains true to the aspiration of our founding fathers. The theme is most relevant and timely. It is especially pertinent in the context of the new Malaysia. The new Government of Malaysia, recently empowered with a strong mandate from its people, is committed to ensure that every Malaysian has an equitable share in the prosperity and wealth of the nation.

A new Malaysia emerged after the 14th General Election in May this year. Malaysians decided to change their government, which had been in power for 61 years, i.e., since independence. We did this because the immediate past Government indulged in the politics of hatred, of racial and religious bigotry, as well as widespread corruption. The process of change was achieved democratically, without violence or loss of lives.

Malaysians want a new Malaysia that upholds the principles of fairness, good governance, integrity and the rule of law. They want a Malaysia that is a friend to all and enemy of none. A Malaysia that remains neutral and non-aligned. A Malaysia that detests and abhors wars and violence. They also want a Malaysia that will speak its mind on what is right and wrong, without fear or favour. A new Malaysia that believes in co-operation based on mutual respect, for mutual gain. The new Malaysia that offers a partnership based on our philosophy of 'prosper-thy-neighbour'. We believe in the goodness of cooperation, that a prosperous and stable neighbour would contribute to our own prosperity and stability.

The new Malaysia will firmly espouse the principles promoted by the UN in our international engagements. These include the principles of truth, human rights, the rule of law, justice, fairness, responsibility and accountability, as well as sustainability. It is within this context that the new government of Malaysia has pledged to ratify all remaining core UN instruments related to the protection of human rights. It will not be easy for us because Malaysia is multi-ethnic, multireligious, multicultural and multilingual. We will accord space and time for all to deliberate and to decide freely based on democracy.



Madam President,

When I last spoke here in 2003, I lamented how the world had lost its way. I bemoaned the fact that small countries continued to be at the mercy of the powerful. I argued the need for the developing world to push for reform, to enhance capacity building and diversify the economy. We need to maintain control of our destiny.

But today, 15 years later the world has not changed much. If at all the world is far worse than 15 years ago. Today the world is in a state of turmoil economically, socially and politically.

There is a trade war going on between the two most powerful economies. And the rest of the world feel the pain.

Socially new values undermine the stability of nations and their people. Freedom has led to the negation of the concept of marriage and families, of moral codes, of respect etc.

But the worse turmoil is in the political arena. We are seeing acts of terror everywhere. People are tying bombs to their bodies and blowing themselves up in crowded places. Trucks are driven into holiday crowds. Wars are fought and people beheaded with short knives. Acts of brutality are broadcast to the world live. Masses of people risk their lives to migrate only to be denied asylum, sleeping in the open and freezing to death. Thousands starve and tens of thousands die in epidemics of cholera.

No one, no country is safe. Security checks inconvenience travellers. No liquids on planes. The slightest suspicion leads to detention and unpleasant questioning.

To fight the "terrorists" all kinds of security measures, all kinds of gadgets and equipment are deployed. Big brother is watching. But the acts of terror continues.

Malaysia fought the bandits and terrorists at independence and defeated them. We did use the military. But alongside and more importantly we campaigned to win the hearts of minds of these people.

This present war against the terrorist will not end until the root causes are found and removed and hearts and minds are won.

What are the root causes? In 1948, Palestinian land was seized to form the state of Israel. The Palestinians were massacred and forced to leave their land. Their houses and farms were seized.

They tried to fight a conventional war with help from sympathetic neighbours. The friends of Israel ensured this attempt failed. More Palestinian land was seized. And Israeli settlements were built on more and more Palestinian land and the Palestinians are denied access to these settlements built on their land.

The Palestinians initially tried to fight with catapults and stones. They were shot with live bullets and arrested. Thousands are incarcerated.

Frustrated and angry, unable to fight a conventional war, the Palestinians resort to what we call terrorism.

The world does not care even when Israel breaks international laws, seizing ships carrying medicine, food and building materials in international waters. The Palestinians fired ineffective rockets which hurt no one. Massive retaliations were mounted by Israel, rocketing and bombing hospitals, schools and other buildings, killing innocent civilians including school children and hospital patients. And more.

The world rewards Israel, deliberately provoking Palestine by recognising Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

It is the anger and frustration of the Palestinians and their sympathisers that cause them to resort to what we call terrorism. But it is important to acknowledge that any act which terrify people also constitute terrorism. And states dropping bombs or launching rockets which maim and kill innocent people also terrify people. These are also acts of terrorism.

Malaysia hates terrorism. We will fight them. But we believe that the only way to fight terrorism is to remove the cause. Let the Palestinians return to reclaim their land. Let there be a state of Palestine. Let there be justice and the rule of law. Warring against them will not stop terrorism. Nor will out-terrorising them succeed.

We need to remind ourselves that the United Nations Organisation, like the League of Nations before, was conceived for the noble purpose of ending wars between nations.

Wars are about killing people. Modern wars are about mass killings and total destruction countrywide. Civilised nations claim they abhor killing for any reason. When a man kills, he commits the crime of murder. And the punishment for murder may be death.

But wars, we all know encourage and legitimise killing. Indeed the killings are regarded as noble, and the killers are hailed as heroes. They get medals stuck to their chest and statues erected in their honour, have their names mentioned in history books.

There is something wrong with our way of thinking, with our value system. Kill one man, it is murder, kill a million and you become a hero. And so we still believe that conflict between nations can be resolved with war.

And because we still do, we must prepare for war. The old adage says "to have peace, prepare for war". And we are forever preparing for war, inventing more and more destructive weapons. We now have nuclear bombs, capable of destroying whole cities. But now we know that the radiation emanating from the explosion will affect even the country using the bomb. A nuclear war would destroy the world.

This fear has caused the countries of Europe and North America to maintain peace for over 70 years. But that is not for other countries. Wars in these other countries can help live test the new weapons being invented.

And so they sell them to warring countries. We see their arms in wars fought between smaller countries. These are not world wars but they are no less destructive. Hundreds of thousands of people have been killed, whole countries devastated and nations bankrupted because of these fantastic new weapons.

But these wars give handsome dividends to the arms manufacturers and traders. The arms business is now the biggest business in the world. They profit shamelessly from the deaths and destructions they cause. Indeed, so-called peace-loving countries often promote this shameful business.

Today's weapons cost millions. Fighter jets cost about 100 million dollars. And maintaining them cost tens of millions. But the poor countries are persuaded to buy them even if they cannot afford. They are told their neighbours or their enemies have them. It is imperative that they too have them.

So, while their people starve and suffer from all kinds of deprivations, a huge percentage of their budget is allocated to the purchase of arms. That their buyers may never have to use them bothers the purveyors not at all.

Madam President,

In Myanmar, Muslims in Rakhine state are being murdered, their homes torched and a million refugees had been forced to flee, to drown in the high seas, to live in makeshift huts, without water or food, without the most primitive sanitation. Yet the authorities of Myanmar including a Nobel Peace Laureate deny that this is happening. I believe in non-interference in the internal affairs of nations. But does the world watch massacres being carried out and do nothing? Nations are independent. But does this mean they have a right to massacre their own people, because they are independent?

Madam President,

TRADE

On the other hand, in terms of trade, nations are no longer independent. Free trade means no protection by small countries of their infant industries. They must abandon tariff restrictions and open their countries to invasion by products of the rich and the powerful. Yet the simple products of the poor are subjected to clever barriers so that they cannot penetrate the market of the rich. Malaysian palm oil is labelled as dangerous to health and the estates are destroying the habitat of animals. Food products of the rich declare that they are palm oil free. Now palm diesel are condemned because they are decimating virgin jungles. These caring people forget that their boycott is depriving hundreds of thousands of people from jobs and a decent life.

We in Malaysia care for the environment. Some 48% of our country remains virgin jungle. Can our detractors claim the same for their own countries?

Madam President,

Malaysia is committed to sustainable development. We have taken steps, for example in improving production methods to ensure that our palm oil production is sustainable. By December 2019, the Malaysian Sustainable Palm Oil (MSPO) standard will become mandatory. This will ensure that every drop of palm oil produced in Malaysia will be certified sustainable by 2020.

Madam President,

All around the world, we observe a dangerous trend to inward-looking nationalism, of governments pandering to populism, retreating from international collaborations and shutting their borders to free movements of people, goods and services even as they talk of a borderless world, of free trade. While globalisation has indeed brought us some benefits, the impacts have proven to be threatening to the independence of small nations. We cannot even talk or move around without having our voices and movement recorded and often used against us. Data on everyone is captured and traded by powerful nations and their corporations.

Malaysia lauds the UN in its endeavours to end poverty, protect our planet and try to ensure everyone enjoys peace and prosperity. But I would like to refer to the need for reform in the organisation. Five countries on the basis of their victories 70 over years ago cannot claim to have a right to hold the world to ransom forever. They cannot take the moral high ground, preaching democracy and regime change in the countries of the world when they deny democracy in this organisation.

I had suggested that the veto should not be by just one permanent member but by at least two powers backed by three non-permanent members of the Security Council. The General Assembly should then back the decision with a simple majority. I will not say more.

I must admit that the world without the UN would be disastrous. We need the UN, we need to sustain it with sufficient funds. No one should threaten it with financial deprivation.

Madam President

After 15 years and at 93, I return to this podium with the heavy task of bringing the voice and hope of the new Malaysia to the world stage. The people of Malaysia, proud of their recent democratic achievement, have high hopes that around the world – we will see peace, progress and prosperity. In this we look toward the UN to hear our pleas.

I thank you, Madam President.

Work Place Bullying | What can you do?


Currently, a friend is being harassed at work with the Head of Department and Directors unable to do anything about it even though they know it is clear cut bullying. That's the purpose for this post, what can you do to resolve this issue?

What most of us do not realise is the fact that there are various forms of harassments that we should start taking note of. Unfortunately, as far as Malaysian laws are concerned, the authorities only pay attention to sexual misconduct under the Employment Act. Other forms of aggressions have lesser attention in the eyes of the local legal system, but there are several existing laws that can be leveraged upon if the cases are serious.

Some scenarios are easy enough to be handled on your own. For example, if your colleague is always standing too close to you or are all touchy-feely, you can move away or make it very clear to them that you need your personal space through your body language.

Sometimes, confronting a co-worker if he or she is being a nuisance just once, will put an end to their antics. But if the matter persists, always seek your supervisor’s advice first. If that doesn’t help, approach your management. When those two don’t work, then move out to seek professional or legal help. This is because, most of the time harassment issues are isolated and can be resolved within the organisation.

Let’s take a look at the different forms of workplace nuisance that fall under the category of harassment.

1 Sexual harassment


This is undoubtedly the most common form of harassment discussed. Sexual harassment can be anything demeaning, offensive, suggestive or lewd to the opposite gender. Most cases in Malaysia involve female victims, but male victims are not unheard of.

Sexual harassment can take the form of verbal, non-verbal, psychological and physical. It can vary from jokes and jesting, to inappropriate touching or sharing of images on the surface level. Action can be taken against organisations that fail to act on complaints of sexual harassment from employees.

According to section 81F of the Employment Act 1955, an employer who fails to inquire into complaints of sexual harassment; inform the complainant of the refusal and reasons behind it; or, submit a report of the inquiry, can be fined up to RM10,000.

2 Threats, disruptive behaviours or misconduct


E-mails and phone calls that can be considered a threat, disturbing behaviour that disrupts the working process, and unnecessary pressuring of workers or co-workers that are serious to cause extreme physical, mental or emotional discomfort, can be considered as a form of harassment.

Keep a clear note of the five Ws and one H (who, what, when, where, why and how) because the last thing you want your management to do is to view your case as a non-threat.

3 Bullying


This term refers to acts of calling names, spreading rumours, damaging of personal properties, harmful or violent physical contact like fights, slapping and punching or non-sexual physical or verbal abuse.

Cyberbullying among colleagues, serious temper tantrums and unfair treatment by the supervisor, abuse of authority, open humiliation, and coercion to perform a task, can fall under the category of bullying.

In the United States, UK, Canada and other countries, action can be taken against co-workers or employers who resort to such acts.

Unfortunately, there is no legislation governing this portion of workplace harassment in Malaysia, but there are possibilities of victims taking action under the Defamation Act 1957.

They can also file a report for constructive dismissal and compensation with the Industrial Court if there are relevant and sufficient proof to convict the harasser.

4 Discriminative harassment


Exhibition of hostile behaviors centred on one’s beliefs, religion, skin colour, sexual orientation and disabilities, can also be demotivating and demeaning. Worse, it could result in extreme tension and unhealthy work environment.

Again, countries like the United States and Canada would not hesitate to act against co-workers or employers who discriminate based on these sentiments or social values.

There are no particular laws here in Malaysia to address such issues, but avenues that can be considered under the Penal Code include intimidation if the matter becomes a criminal case. Other labour laws which include unfair discrimination can also be considered.

Gender discrimination does carry some weight and is viewed more seriously as gender equality is a constitutional right. Gone are the days where this scenario only applies to women.

What can employees do?


1 Take action


Be bold and file a complaint or make that meeting with your human resources (HR) personnel happen if you are facing any form of harassment. Don’t underestimate your ability to change things, even if you are alone in your journey.

Follow up with your HR department if the matter is being investigated or if action will be taken. Suppose your HR department fails to provide you a satisfactory answer—after numerous attempts—have the courage to seek legal advice or make a police report if the matter is serious.

2 Speak to someone


The last thing you want to do is remain quiet about such issues like sexual harassment and bullying. By speaking to trustworthy colleagues, you are not only helping to address the matter, but may open up a can of worms which is a good thing in this situation. For all you know, you may have helped other people in the process.

You could also speak to your supervisor (if he or she isn’t directly involved) to rally some support or deliberate on ideas to tackle less threatening issues like emotional blackmailing or disruptive behaviours.

3 Know your rights


Read up. Have basic knowledge on labour, employment and management laws. It will help you determine your next course of action if you or your colleagues are affected. Knowing your rights is always a good thing even if your workplace is devoid of harassment issues.

4 Don't publicise the matter on social media


This could backfire on you. Apart from it breaching the code of ethics or your employment contract (when you share internal issues that could possibly compromise your company’s credentials), you are also opening up possibilities of lawsuits if the matter becomes public.

No doubt you will garner support from family and friends but professionally, it may do more harm than good.


What can management do?


Harassment issues can be minor but they have a tendency to grow out of proportion if no proper attention is given. It is the job of the HR management to ensure that the workplace is harassment-free. There are ample steps that the management can take to arrest this issue:

1 Have a strong complaints or suggestions box


Management should take this avenue seriously. Most employees, particularly those who are modest or reserved, will find it extremely difficult to share their situations openly.

Most workers may think that the management will always take the side of other management staff (in harassment scenarios that involve higher management personnel) and would be apprehensive in filing a complaint.

It is therefore important for management and HR divisions to be as welcoming as possible or let the employees know that they can be easily approached for personal discussions.

2 Take action


Yes, it takes time and effort, but it helps maintain a healthy environment when management takes action against complaints of harassment of any form. This also maintains the trust of your employees.

3 Be transparent, but protect complainants' information


Harassed victims need to feel protected and they can only rely on management to back them up if they are victimised in any situation. Management should let employees know that they can seek your advice and that their identities will be protected.

It’s not easy to work in an environment where the “harasser” and the “harassed” meet eye-to-eye all the time. Being transparent about such processes can help ease any form of hostility and maintain workplace harmony.

4 Have guidelines or code of ethics


Every organisation generally has ethics and rules for various employment aspects in place. Remind everyone from time to time about these guidelines and let them know that you do view harassment cases, whether sexual or otherwise, seriously and will not hesitate to take action, amounting to dismissal or other forms of legal address.

5 Have an in-house or external counsellor


This may sound like an additional cost but it may be necessary from time to time. If issues of harassment get out of control, your workers can suffer from psychological and emotional distress. If these issues are not addressed professionally, it can affect productivity and the employees’ mental health.

In addition, having a counsellor can help address problems especially if the nature of your business is highly stressful.

The caretaker government’s role

For those of you who are unsure what role does a caretaker government play once the Parliament is dissolved to prepare for the next General Election. Here's an excerpt that will help you understand them.
Infographics from Bernama.


By Syahredzan Johan

Elections these days are hard- fought affairs. The margins of victory can be very slim. Any advantage that one side has may affect the outcome of the elections.

That is why there is a need to ensure elections are fair to all those contesting.

The dissolution of Parliament does not mean that the Federal Government and the various state governments are also dissolved along with the legislature.

When the legislature is dissolved to pave the way for elections, and until a new government is formed, the one that governs the Federation or the states is known as the “caretaker government”, according to the practice in many Commonwealth countries, including Malaysia.

However, the Federal and state constitutions do not expressly provide for the caretaker government. The constitutions are silent on the role of these “caretaker governments”; they are not provided for expressly by law.

A caretaker government is a minimum government. It is only supposed to ensure the day-to-day administration of the state can continue without disruption as a caretaker.

A caretaker government should not, for example, do anything which may bind the new government. It should not announce new government initiatives or make new policy decisions. It should not enter into new agreements or undertakings. It should also not make new appointments.

Most importantly, it should not use government machinery and resources in any way which would give any political party an advantage.

The reasoning is simple; the caretaker government no longer has the full mandate of the electorate. As the legislative branch has been dissolved, there are no checks and balances to the actions of the executive branch.

Unfortunately, the caretaker government convention is not respected or followed by the Federal or state governments.

Every day since dissolution, there are reports of initiatives or handouts by an incumbent government, on both sides of the political divide.

The caretaker government convention is also recognised in other jurisdictions. In most other jurisdictions, the caretaker government is not codified and is merely a convention.

However, the convention is respected and adhered to strictly by the incumbents.

Ideally, this should be the case in our country. There should not be a need to codify the convention into law by way of legislation. But because our political parties do not appear to respect the convention, we may need to enact a law to enshrine the caretaker convention and ensure its compliance.

13 Things To Give Up If You Want To Be Successful

by Zdravko Cvijetic

To become successful and get closer to the person you can become, you don’t need to add more things — you need to give some of them up.

There are certain things that are universal, which will make you successful if you give up on them, even though each one of us could have a different definition of success.

You can give up on some of them as soon as today, while it might take a bit longer to give up on others.

1. Give Up On The Unhealthy Lifestyle

“Take care of your body. It’s the only place you have to live.”
If you want to achieve anything in life, everything starts here. First, you should take care of your health, and there are only three things you need to keep in mind:


  1. Quality Sleep
  2. Healthy Diet
  3. Physical Activity

Small steps, but you will thank yourself one day.

2. Give Up The Short-term Mindset

“You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.” 

Successful people set long-term goals, and they know these aims are merely the result of short-term habits that they need to do every day.

These healthy habits shouldn’t be something you do; they should be something you embody.

There is a difference between: “Working out to get a summer body” and “Working out because that’s who you are.”


3. Give Up On Playing Small

“Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people will not feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. It is not just in some of us; it is in everyone, and as we let our light shine, we unconsciously give others permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our fear, our presence automatically liberates others.”
If you never try and take great opportunities or allow your dreams to become realities, you will never unleash your true potential.

And the world will never benefit from what you could have achieved.

So voice your ideas, don’t be afraid to fail, and certainly don’t be afraid to succeed.

4. Give Up Your Excuses

“It’s not about the cards you’re dealt, but how you play the hand.”

Successful people know that they are responsible for their life, no matter their starting point, weaknesses, and past failures.

Realising that you are responsible for what happens next in your life is both frightening and exciting.

And when you do, that becomes the only way you can become successful, because excuses limit and prevent us from growing personally and professionally.

Own your life; no one else will.

5. Give Up The Fixed Mindset

“The future belongs to those who learn more skills and combine them in creative ways.”
People with a fixed mindset think their intelligence or talents are pre-determined traits that cannot be changed. They also believe that talent alone leads to success — without hard work. But they’re wrong.

Successful people know this. They invest an immense amount of time on a daily basis to develop a growth mindset, acquire new knowledge, learn new skills and change their perception so that it can benefit their lives.

Who you are today is not who you have to be tomorrow.

6. Give Up Believing In The “Magic Bullet.”

“Every day, in every way, I’m getting better and better”
Overnight success is a myth.

Successful people know that making small continuous improvement every day will be compounded over time and give them desired results.

That is why you should plan for the future, but focus on the day that’s ahead of you, and improve just 1% every day.

7. Give Up Your Perfectionism

“Shipping beats perfection.” 
Nothing will ever be perfect, no matter how much you try.

Fear of failure (or even fear of success) often prevents you from taking action and putting your creation out there in the world. But a lot of opportunities will be lost if you wait for things to be right.

So “ship,” and then improve (that 1%).

8. Give Up Multi-tasking

“Most of the time multitasking is an illusion. You think you are multitasking, but in reality, you are actually wasting time switching from one task to another “

Successful people know this.

That’s why they choose one thing and then beat it into submission. No matter what it is — a business idea, a conversation, or a workout.

Being fully present and committed to one task is indispensable.

9. Give Up Your Need to Control Everything

“Some things are up to us, and some things are not up to us.”
Differentiating these two is crucial.

Detach from the things you cannot control, focus on the ones you can, and know that sometimes, the only thing you will be able to control is your attitude towards something.

Remember: nobody can be frustrated while saying “Bubbles” in an angry voice.

10. Give Up On Saying YES To Things That Don’t Support Your Goals

“He who would accomplish little must sacrifice little; he who would achieve much must sacrifice much; he who would attain highly must sacrifice greatly.”
Successful people know that in order to accomplish their goals, they will have to say NO to certain tasks, activities, and demands from their friends, family, and colleagues.

In the short-term, you might sacrifice a bit of instant gratification, but when your goals come to fruition, it will all be worth it.

11. Give Up The Toxic People

“Stay away from negative people. They have a problem for every solution.”
People you spend the most time with add up to who you become.

If you spend time with those who refuse to take responsibility for their life, always find excuses and blame others for the situation they are in, your average will go down, and with it your opportunity to succeed.

However, if you spend time with people who are trying to increase their standard of living, and grow personally and professionally, your average will go up, and you will become more successful.

Take a look at around you, and see if you need to make any changes.

12. Give Up Your Need To Be Liked

“You can be the juiciest, ripest peach in the world, and there’s still going to be people who hate peaches.”
Think of yourself as a market niche.

There will be a lot of people who like that niche, and there will be individuals who don’t. And no matter what you do, you won’t be able to make the entire market like you.

This is completely natural, and there’s no need to justify yourself.

The only thing you can do is to remain authentic, improve and provide value every day, and know that the growing number of “haters” means that you are doing remarkable things.

13. Give Up Wasting Time

“The trouble is, you think you have time”
You only have this one crazy and precious life. That’s why you owe it to yourself to see who you can become, and how far you can go.

However, to do that, you need to ditch meaningless time wasters and stop allowing them to be an escape from your most important goals.

To do that, you should learn how to take control over your focus, attention and make the most out of your 24 hours within a day.

Remember that you will die, so never stop creating your legacy and doing the things that will enrich your life.

Traits the Smartest People Have in Common


by Marcel Schwantes

This is a type of smartness that one acquires from a way of being, not doing.

You can be popular, talented, and brainy, but that doesn't mean you're smart (in an emotionally-intelligent sense). Ultimately, you'll find that smart people have keen insight into situations and practice good judgment.

But this is a type of smartness that one acquires from a way of being, not doing. It's wisdom that starts and ends with character, intuition, and integrity--not IQ or through the acquisition of more knowledge or expertise.

What choices do you see smart people make? Well, if you are one of them, you'd agree with me that these are normal-day occurrences for you. Do you agree?

You seek out reverse mentors.

Sure, books, webinars, classes, and the like help, but smart people stretch their knowledge beyond intellectual pursuits. A smart person is also wise enough to soak up the wisdom of others, acknowledging that they don't know it all. Here's a quote I saw the other day:

If you're the smartest person in the room, you're in the wrong room.

Metaphorically, you view yourself as a small fish in the great big pond of life. You'll seek out connections and appointments to learn to do great new things.

This includes finding a "reverse mentor." For years, we have thought of mentors as older and more experienced sages. And that's entirely appropriate, and there will always be a role for that type of mentorship.

But in this social era, smart people are catching on to the advantage of learning from reverse mentors. They can be younger and less experienced, but they're technologically-savvy and hold other expertise in unfamiliar terrain.

Smart people are open to new ideas, and they leverage reverse-mentor relationships as a work strategy. And if you're a boss, when bosses seek out and listen to their Millennial mentors to get fresh perspective, they will love and respect you.

You watch your words when you speak.

There's an old saying from a wise leader that goes like this:

Words satisfy the mind as much as fruit does the stomach; good talk is as gratifying as a good harvest.

So much conflict, confusion, and misunderstanding comes from our words and what we communicate.

Smart people are careful about what they speak, give good and sound advice, don't talk out of both sides of their mouth, and have the other person's best interest in mind. When they do these things, they get a lot more in return.


You're self-aware.

Self-awareness can alert you to what relationships to invest in and what advisers to seek counsel from. If they're having lunch with someone who is spreading malicious things about others, smart people are intuitive enough to know they may be next on his list. They walk away.

They're also aware of groupthink mentality at work, which can quickly lead to a toxic bandwagon that may send your reputation down the toilet. Smart people use self-awareness to recognize those red flags.

You're probably an introvert.

Chances are, if you grew up as that awkward, quiet, geeky kid with social anxiety, you were probably special and didn't know it. The Gifted Development Center says that 60 percent of gifted children are introverted.

It gets better. As an adult, you now leverage your strength for processing, contemplating, and thinking things over, which is a trait of really smart people. In fact, more than 75 percent of people with an IQ above 160 are introverted.

You're curious.

Albert Einstein famously said, "I have no special talents. I am only passionately curious."

Harvard Business Review reports that people with a higher "curiosity quotient" (CQ) are more inquisitive and generate more original ideas, and this "thinking style" leads to higher levels of knowledge acquisition over time.

CQ, the author states, "is the ultimate tool to produce simple solutions for complex problems."

You are a prolific listener.

Active listening is one of the least-taught skills in leadership, yet it's the most utilized. As studies point out, we spend 70 to 80 percent of our waking hours in some form of communication, and of that time, 45 percent is spent listening.

And while many people assume they're good listeners, studies confirm that most of us are poor and inefficient listeners. When you talk to your boss, co-workers, or customers for 10 minutes, studies say we pay attention to less than half of the conversation. Within 48 hours, whatever information we've retained decreases to 25 percent. In other words, we often comprehend and retain only one-fourth of what we hear.

Smart people know better. They leverage their active listening skills for solving problems, building trust, and winning the hearts and minds of people.

Signs You’re Too Close To Your Boss

by Kelsey Borresen

Strong relationships with colleagues can improve your work life. But if you’re overly close with a superior ― namely, your boss― the bond could actually do more harm than good, according to psychologist and executive coach Kate Snowise.

“It is great to have personal relationships at work, and research demonstrates that having a close friend at work is one of the greatest contributors to job satisfaction, but things can get weird if this person is your boss, due to the potential power they have with your career,” she told HuffPost.

We asked experts to share the telltale signs that the relationship with your boss has ventured into unhealthy or inappropriate territory.

1. You stop receiving constructive feedback about your work performance.

“There is a fine line between being a boss and a friend, and being a boss requires sometimes having the hard conversations. If you’re getting too close to your boss, you may have found that you haven’t received any constructive feedback or don’t get any guidance on how you can take your career to the next level. Friends usually don’t want to upset or offend us, but it’s often the hard feedback delivered by a boss that can be some of the greatest fuel to help us move forward in our careers.” ― Kate Snowise

2. You start feeling like the teacher’s pet.

“This is often the first red flag. You feel singled out for plum projects and are taken to lunch more often than other members of the team. You may also get more face time with you manager. This is dangerous territory not only for the manager and company ― particularly with the greater awareness of bullying and sexual harassment claims of late ― but for you. You risk being ostracized by your peers and may find it difficult to get cooperation from coworkers.” ― Lynn Taylor, workplace expert and author of Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior & Thrive in Your Job

3. You two share inside jokes that make your colleagues uncomfortable.

“It’s OK if you develop a friendship with your boss outside of work. But it can be detrimental if you start forming inside jokes that spill into the workplace. If you find yourself sitting in meetings and you and your boss are sharing knowing glances with each other in reference to colleagues, you’re too close. This sort of behavior diminishes workplace morale and will damage productivity at work.” ― Alena Gerst, psychotherapist

4. Your meetings are more social than work-oriented.

“If you’re too close to your boss, often the line between work and play can get blurred. The danger is that you may find that you don’t get the direction or support you need, as your meetings can often become more of a social catch-up than an opportunity to discuss real work-based issues or the need for guidance. You can help get around this by sending your boss agenda items of the things you want to discuss before any meeting.” ― Kate Snowise

5. You feel obligated to see each other outside of work.

“It’s one thing to be invited to an occasional lunch alone by your manager. But if you’re being singled out, it’s happening often and it starts being combined with other outings, such as drinks or dinner, the relationship is likely crossing a healthy boundary. You should be able to do your job during normal working hours and never feel uncomfortable about the time and/or place. If you do, it’s your right to speak up immediately, with diplomacy.” ― Lynn Taylor

6. You start venting to each other like you would to a close friend or therapist.

“As much as someone can say that whatever you say to them won’t affect their impression of you, we’re all human and certain things can’t be unheard. So be careful what you share with your boss. If you find yourself using your boss as a venting buddy, telling them about your frustrations with the workplace and how you’re so hung over you can barely function, you might want to learn to keep your mouth shut.” ― Kate Snowise

7. The relationship becomes flirtatious.

“If you feel like you’re on a date versus ‘on the clock,’ there’s reason to develop an immediate strategy to deal with it. Your manager may call you by an affectionate name or cross the line with an unwanted hug, and you see this repeated. You’re made to feel awkward, and it’s difficult to be productive. The longer you wait to put a stop to their behavior, the more challenging it will be ― and the legal ramifications of this can be significant. The employer, your boss and you could all be part of a hostile work environment legal claim from other workers.” ― Lynn Taylor

8 Secrets of Great Communicators

by Dr. Travis Bradberry

When it comes to communication, we all tend to think we’re pretty good at it. Truth is, even those of us who are good communicators aren’t nearly as good as we think we are. This overestimation of our ability to communicate is magnified when interacting with people we know well.

Researchers at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business put this theory to the test and what they discovered is startling. In the study, the researchers paired subjects with people they knew well and then again with people they’d never met. The researchers discovered that people who knew each other well understood each other no better than people who’d just met! Even worse, participants frequently overestimated their ability to communicate, and this was more pronounced with people they knew well.

“Our problem in communicating with friends is that we have an illusion of insight,” said study co-author Nicholas Epley. “Getting close to someone appears to create the illusion of understanding more than actual understanding.”

When communicating with people we know well, we make presumptions about what they understand—presumptions that we don’t dare make with strangers. This tendency to overestimate how well we communicate (and how well we’re understood) is so prevalent that psychologists even have a name for it: closeness-communication bias.

“The understanding, ‘What I know is different from what you know’ is essential for effective communication,” said study lead Kenneth Savitsky, “but that insight can be elusive. Some [people] may indeed be on the same wavelength, but maybe not as much as they think. You get rushed and preoccupied, and you stop taking the perspective of the other person.”
Taking Action

Communication is the real work of leadership; you simply can’t become a great leader until you are a great communicator. Great communicators inspire people. They create a connection that is real, emotional, and personal. And great communicators forge this connection through an understanding of people and an ability to speak directly to their needs in a manner that they are ready to hear.

"The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place." -George Bernard Shaw
The eight strategies that follow will help you to overcome the communication bias that tends to hold us back with everyone we encounter, especially those we know well. Apply these strategies and watch your communication skills reach new heights.

Speak to groups as individuals. As a leader, you often have to speak to groups of people. Whether a small team meeting or a company-wide gathering, you need to develop a level of intimacy in your approach that makes each individual in the room feel as if you’re speaking directly to him or her. The trick is to eliminate the distraction of the crowd so that you can deliver your message just as you would if you were talking to a single person. You want to be emotionally genuine and exude the same feelings, energy, and attention you would one-on-one (as opposed to the anxiety that comes with being in front of people). The ability to pull this off is the hallmark of great leadership communication.

Talk so people will listen. Great communicators read their audience (groups and individuals) carefully to ensure they aren’t wasting their breath on a message that people aren’t ready to hear. Talking so people will listen means you adjust your message on the fly to stay with your audience (what they’re ready to hear and how they’re ready to hear it). Droning on to ensure you’ve said what you wanted to say does not have the same effect on people as engaging them in a meaningful dialogue in which there is an exchange of ideas. Resist the urge to drive your point home at all costs. When your talking leads to people asking good questions, you know you’re on the right track.

Listen so people will talk. One of the most disastrous temptations for a leader is to treat communication as a one-way street. When you communicate, you must give people ample opportunity to speak their minds. If you find that you’re often having the last word in conversations, then this is likely something you need to work on.

Listening isn’t just about hearing words; it’s also about listening to the tone, speed, and volume of the voice. What is being said? Anything not being said? What hidden messages below the surface exist? When someone is talking to you, stop everything else and listen fully until the other person has finished speaking. When you are on a phone call, don’t type an email. When you’re meeting with someone, close the door and sit near the person so you can focus and listen. Simple behaviors like these will help you stay in the present moment, pick up on the cues the other person sends, and make it clear that you will really hear what he or she is saying.

Connect emotionally. Maya Angelou said it best: “People will forget what you said and did, but they will never forget how you made them feel.” As a leader, your communication is impotent if people don’t connect with it on an emotional level. This is hard for many leaders to pull off because they feel they need to project a certain persona. Let that go. To connect with your people emotionally, you need to be transparent. Be human. Show them what drives you, what you care about, what makes you get out of bed in the morning. Express these feelings openly, and you’ll forge an emotional connection with your people.

Read body language. Your authority makes it hard for people to say what’s really on their minds. No matter how good a relationship you have with your subordinates, you are kidding yourself if you think they are as open with you as they are with their peers. So, you must become adept at understanding unspoken messages. The greatest wealth of information lies in people’s body language. The body communicates nonstop and is an abundant source of information, so purposefully watch body language during meetings and casual conversation. Once you tune into body language, the messages will become loud and clear. Pay as much attention to what isn’t said as what is said, and you’ll uncover facts and opinions that people are unwilling to express directly.

Prepare your intent. A little preparation goes a long way toward saying what you wanted to say and having a conversation achieve its intended impact. Don’t prepare a speech; develop an understanding of what the focus of a conversation needs to be (in order for people to hear the message) and how you will accomplish this. Your communication will be more persuasive and on point when you prepare your intent ahead of time.

Skip the jargon. The business world is filled with jargon and metaphors that are harmless when people can relate to them. Problem is, most leaders overuse jargon and alienate their subordinates and customers with their “business speak.” Use it sparingly if you want to connect with your people. Otherwise, you’ll come across as insincere.

Practice active listening. Active listening is a simple technique that ensures people feel heard, an essential component of good communication. To practice active listening:
  • Spend more time listening than you do talking.
  • Do not answer questions with questions.
  • Avoid finishing other people’s sentences.
  • Focus more on the other person than you do on yourself.
  • Focus on what people are saying right now, not on what their interests are.
  • Reframe what the other person has said to make sure you understand him or her correctly (“So you’re telling me that this budget needs further consideration, right?”)
  • Think about what you’re going to say after someone has finished speaking, not while he or she is speaking.
  • Ask plenty of questions.
  • Never interrupt.
  • Don’t take notes.
Bringing It All Together

As you work to employ these strategies, try to avoid biting off more than you can chew. Working on one to three strategies at a time is sufficient. If you try to take on more than you can handle, you’re not going to see as much progress as you would if you narrowed your focus. Once you become effective in one particular strategy, you can take on another one in its place. Communication is a dynamic element of leadership that is intertwined in most of what you do each day. You’ll have ample opportunity to improve your abilities in this critical skill.

What do you think is the secret to great communication? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below as I learn just as much from you as you do from me.

Leadership Peak 2018 Signing and Official Launch


QUEST Entrepreneurs Mastery (QEM), an entrepreneur community builder, WeStyleAsia Academy, Malaysia’s leading personal personal grooming education platform and Focus Malaysia, one of Malaysia’s top business weekly officially sealed their partnership in the organising of
Malaysia’s inaugural Leadership Peak 2018 that is scheduled to be held on 25 January 2018.

The MoU was signed by Mr. Ivan Yap, Executive Director of QEM, Mr. Arthur Tan, Founder and CEO of WeStyleAsia as well as Mr. Dan Loh, Chief Operating Officer of Focus Malaysia along with the unveiling of Leadership Peak logo, the event was graced by Guests-of-Honours,
Datin Winnie Loo, Founder of A Cut Above and Mr. Raja Singham, Founder & Managing Director of Brickfields Asia College.



The signing ceremony officiates the launch of Leadership Peak 2018 and announced that registration
open to those who wish to be part of this value-packed conference. The Leadership Peak Conference
2018, with the tagline “No Title? Who Cares! You Are Still a Leader” is mainly aimed at corporate
leaders, C-Level management, SMEs, business owners, start-up owners as well as aspiring
entrepreneurs so that they can impart the theme to their team of executives. To be held on 25 January 2018 at Zebra Square, Kuala Lumpur. The 1-day conference will encompass topics revolving around leadership, personal empowerment and business management.

“The entire idea of running this Leadership Peak Conference is to disrupt the traditional approach of
running a business in order to revitalise and bring innovation to the entire business community,”
said Mr Ivan Yap. “And to do that, we focus on inspiring change at the core of every business –
leadership.”



The full day conference will feature power house speakers and panelists such as Raja Jesrina Arshad
from Purely B, Ehon Chan from MaGiC, Brian Tan from Futurelabs, Ili Sulaiman from Dishbyili &
Agak-Agak, Angel Tashveer from WanderClass and Andrew Tan from CrowdPlus Asia for the start-up scene as well as Ken Lim from Kens Apothecary, Hugh Koh from Pestle & Mortar and Joanne Kay from Ultron for the SME scene. An interesting session featuring Unsung Heroes of the business
scene include Giden from BloomThis and Jonathan Quek from Owners’ Circle. A session focusing on women empowerment is also scheduled to feature inspiring and influential women such as Hannah Tan. Speakers that will speak to inspire during the conference are Raja Singham of Brickfields Asia College and Datin Winnie Loo of A Cut Above Group of Salons. Other topics that will be included also throughout the day are branding, investment, relationships and management.

“We hope that through this conference, we can bridge the gap between market leaders and
entrepreneurs from all company sizes so that they can learn and inspire from one another,” said Mr.
Dan Loh, COO of Focus Malaysia.



This event is also one-of-its-kind where the organisers initiated a charity movement titled
“#LeadersAreGivers” in conjunction with Leadership Peak. With this, the Organisers hope to
empower participants of the event to ‘walk the talk’ as leaders by taking part in charity with their
effort and time. The charity is in partnership with Brickfields Asia College. “As leaders, we also need
to take the lead in giving back to the society,” said Mr. Arthur Tan.

An early bird rate of RM299 per person is available until 24 December 2017. A normal rate of RM499 per person will be applicable after that. Each entry ticket holder is entitled to get a goodie bag worth no less than RM1,500. To register or learn more about Leadership Peak Conference 2018, head on to www.leadershippeak.com or follow their progress via facebook.com/leadershippeak.


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MICHAEL YIP
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Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia