MICHAEL YIP

I AM A

image
Hello,

I'm Michael Yip

I am a video producer and photographer by profession. As a photographer, one of my core skills is in dance event photography, as one of only a handful of photographers experienced in covering dance events, performances and portraits. I got a chance to countries around the Asian region capturing visuals to help participants of the events immortalize their moments. If you are interested in bringing me over to your festivals/events. Just head over to the contact section and drop me a message.

Through GEMNUINE - the idea co., my team and I also provides Brand Management and PR services. Our core expertise is in helping brands evolve and attract the current market. We also provides Digital Marketing and Management services, from web designs to social media management. Drop me an email today at mike@gemnuine.com and let us know how you want us to help you.

If you are stumped by the photo, yes, I dance as well, mainly Salsa, Bachata, Kizomba, West Coast Swing and Argentine Tango. I have since stopped performing due to injuries but if you are looking for performers for corporate events/functions/parties/festivals. Do drop me a message as well as I manages some of the dance teams that is currently making the rounds performing for various clients.


Education
Kolej Bandar Utama/Central St. Martin

Diploma in Arts and Design

Kolej Damansara Utama

Diploma in Telecommunication Engineering

SMK Damansara Utama

SPM


Experience
Photographer/Video Producer

MIKE YIP STUDIO

Branding and PR

GEMNUINE - the idea co.

Digital Marketing Solutions

Abood Media Sdn Bhd


My Skills
Photography and Video Production
Brand Management and Solutions
Public Relations
Digital Marketing Solutions

14

Confirmed Bookings for 2018

4

Confirmed Destinations for 2018

6

Confirmed Dance Festivals for 2018

4

Talks Confirmed for 2018

WHAT CAN MY TEAM DO

Photography and Video Production

As our core business, this is what we are good at, capturing visuals that brings out the best for your brand.

Branding and PR

Through GEMNUINE, we specializes in helping brands redevelop, redefine and create a comprehensive marketing strategies reach the target market.

Social Media Marketing

Abood Media Sdn Bhd's core strenght in Digital Marketing Services focuses on Social Media Management and promotions.

Web Design

We also design and revamp websites as part of Abood Media Sdn Bhd's services.

Live Event Streaming Production

As part of a new offering from MIKE YIP STUDIO and partners, we also provides Live Streaming services for Events through dedicated sites or onto social media platforms.

Efficient

We pride ourselves at being good and efficient in what we do and we always try our best to deliver services that exceeds our client's expectations.

I also blogs

Who says Muslims can’t vote for non-Muslim leaders?


Malaysia is a multicultural and multi-confessional country whose official religion is Islam. The country’s constitution allows Muslims and non-Muslims to be represented in Parliament for harmonious governance. There is no rule as agreed on in the constitution stipulating that a Muslim cannot vote for a non-Muslim representative or vice- versa. It is this judicious system that has made democracy work in the country.

Under the constitution, while Islam is the official religion, followers of other beliefs are allowed to practise their faiths without hindrance. The elected government, on its part, comprises leaders from various religious and racial backgrounds, without religion encroaching into worldly state affairs.

Unfortunately, some local clerics have fallen into the pit of fixation and fanaticism for the sake of political gain. They do not hesitate to give speeches based on their own interpretation of religion, that “Muslims cannot choose a non-Muslim leader”. This is unacceptable when it comes to state matters in our democracy.

It may be religiously correct when related solely to matters of faith, but not when it involves state matters. Obviously, the state cannot appoint a non-Muslim to look into the religious affairs of Muslims – the appointment of a mufti, for instance.

Quoting verses from the holy book and interpreting them according to their whims to justify their decree for political expediency may not always be right. It has been recognised by Islamic scholars that even though sacred texts contain holy words, their interpretation and application are human acts that can be debated and transmuted in an inclusive manner. These give-and-take dynamics were found even in the earliest days of Islamic civilisation. In choosing a leader to deal with state matters, it’s espoused in Islam that the person should have the trust and capability to deal with the tasks given to him or her.

Unfortunately, this discourse on the “divine and the human” seems embroiled in confusion among some clerics, which has resulted in religion usurping or rescinding the wisdom of the people. They seem to promulgate intolerance of others in a multi-religious society, and this could even lead to supreme authorisation.

In this age of democracy, we should not be faced with the dilemma of whether a Muslim is allowed to choose a leader who is not a Muslim. Neither should it be the other way around – whether non-Muslims are allowed to choose a Muslim as their leader.

People of a single race or religion should not dictate who should lead the country. In a democracy, we have the right to choose the candidate whom we believe is best qualified for the post.

For Muslim thinkers, Islam is seen as compatible with modern secular democracies. Clerics who think otherwise are not keeping up with modern times and the reality of the world we live in today. These clerics feel that they are bound by the Al-Maidah verse 5:51 of the Quran that, according to their interpretation, “forbids Muslims to associate with or vote for non-Muslims”. And they argue that “there is no precedence of choosing a non-Muslim leader” during the Caliph era.

However, they stop short at that to confuse the masses. They fail to convince the people that many Muslims at the time, especially those originally from Medina, had strong bonds with people from non-Muslim tribes, dating back even before Islam as well as during the khilafah rule.

“Allah does not forbid you from showing kindness and dealing justly with those who have not fought you due to your faith or driven you out of your homes. Allah loves those who deal justly. Allah only forbids you from those people that fought you because of your faith, drove you out of your homes and helped in your expulsion, that you take them as intimate associates. And whosoever takes them as intimate associates, then it is they who are the wrongdoers.” (Quran, 60:8-9)

This verse should set the tone for how we see verse 5:51, which has often been misused to claim that Islam orders Muslims not to have any sort of good relations with non-Muslims at all, an interpretation which is refuted by the above verse in the Quran.

Scholars have argued over this interpretation of the verse, saying the verse was revealed and was only applicable during the time of wars and enemies, when the non-Muslims tried to suppress the Muslims. This is never the case in the present context where Muslims and non-Muslims are not at war with each other.

Don’t be reclusive in thought

In the present democracy, there is a separation between state and religion in a country like Malaysia, for instance. The state in general does not have the authority to intervene in religious matters, unlike the caliphs and Islamic leaders of the past. In fact, the concept of “state” did not even exist in the seventh century. They were the least sophisticated as they had only loosely knit tribal forms of administration until the advent of the Ottoman Empire (c. 1299 –1920).

In Malaysia, religion comes under the authority of individual state rulers. At the federal level, the government only provides a governing body on religious affairs under an appointed minister who, in this case, has to be Muslim. Jakim was thus established in 1997, but even this measure was an afterthought, implemented when leaders saw the unending controversies miring the religious teachings in the country. The leaders of all these religious bodies are appointed from among Muslims.

Muslims should be wise enough not to be in reclusive in thought when confronted by skewed clerics. Supporting non-Muslim candidates in a democracy where there is a separation of state and religion cannot be considered a wrong act for Muslims. Historical precedence based on isolated events of the past does not hold water in the context of modern democracy.

In fact, in Islam there is no absolute model for political rule. The Islamic form of government depends on the circumstances. Government, according to Islam, will be decided by the circumstances. According to Islam, a political form is not a part of belief. They are separate entities. This is where some obsessive clerics are confused in their approach to Islam. It is always the prevailing situation that will determine the type of political form that has to be adopted. This is what democracy is.

In Islamic history, the modest administrative form adopted after the Prophet was based on khilafah. It was not an absolute form, though. Later on, the dynastic model of administration was adopted. The models set by other Prophets are also an Islamic model. This is because the Quran accepts all messengers as models as mentioned in the Quran (6:90): “Those [the previous prophets] were the people whom God guided. Follow their guidance then and say, I ask no reward for this from you: it is only a reminder for all mankind.”

The democratic model of today

Following this principle, the democratic model of today is also an accepted model in Islam. This is supported by the following verse of the Quran: “… and their affairs are by counsel among themselves” (42:38). According to these precedents, if voters elect a non-Muslim leader it would be considered a right choice according to Islam. In the Malaysian context, there is no prohibition on elected Muslim and non-Muslim leaders who are not adversaries in the social and political sense having mutual consultation and working in tandem for the people and the betterment of the nation.

It would not be regarded as a wrongful choice or a sin for Muslims to work with or choose leaders from among the non-Muslims. Hopefully, those clerics in PAS will stop distorting the message of Islam to confuse the people just to seek political power. In fact, this act of theirs is debauchery and against Islam.

In Islam, political form is not related to belief. For instance, the government does not have a set form as does a religious ritual, such as steps and ways to perform the haj or prayers. Governance is related to circumstances or practical insights that are flexible and can vary with time and according to the wishes of the people. It’s the quests for real-world intuitions that will decide the form of government to be adopted in a democracy. The values adopted by leaders and in governance, however, can indirectly be consonant with the universal values found in Islam as well as other religions, such as being knowledgeable, competent, honest and trustworthy.

by Moaz Nair

Your conduct reflects on your company


FREEDOM of expression is recognized and the Internet has provided the tool for individuals to express their opinions and views.

However, this recognized right should be exercised sparingly and not abused or misused. Abuse of the freedom of expression may expose the individual to civil and criminal liability.

In the sphere of employment relations, an employee is expected to uphold the company’s good name and image. Any conduct of an employee at the workplace which is likely to damage the reputation of the employer may constitute misconduct and will lead to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. Likewise, an employee’s outside workplace activities may trigger disciplinary action when the wrongful conduct of the employee damages the company’s reputation or brings the company into public disrepute.

Hence, an employee should avoid making insensitive or defamatory remarks against the company or others on social media as such conduct or action has the potential of bringing the company into odium and disrepute in the minds of right-thinking members of society.

The situation includes when an employee publishes derogatory statements online against an individual or authority. In the aforesaid circumstances, the termination is warranted as their continued employment would pose a risk to the employer’s reputation.

Recently, several employees of local companies came under fire for insulting Sultan Muhammad V when he stepped down as the Yang di-Pertuan Agong.

Earlier, a local automobile dealer dismissed its employee over her insensitive Facebook remark about the death of the firefighter Muhammad Adib Mohd Kassim.

Although the act was committed outside the workplace, such conduct has implications on the employer’s goodwill and reputation with a high possibility of the public shunning the employer for retaining such ill-manned employees. It is noteworthy that the employment relationship is built on mutual trust and confidence that calls for an employee to uphold the company’s reputation at all times.

In short, an employee ought to take heed of the repercussions arising from sending fake news to public websites or posting information that is defamatory of others even if such action is done outside the workplace and work hours.

by ASHGAR ALI ALI MOHAMED
Ahmad Ibrahim Kulliyyah of Laws
International Islamic University Malaysia

Want to know more?

Contact Us
MICHAEL YIP
fb.com/mikeyipdotcom
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia